Extracellular signal-regulated kinases in T cells: Anti-CD3 and 4β- phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-induced phosphorylation and activation

Charles E. Whitehurst, Teri G. Boulton, Melanie H. Cobb, Thomas D. Geppert

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

90 Scopus citations

Abstract

Extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) 1 and 2 are growth factor- and cytokine-sensitive serine/threonine kinases that are known to phosphorylate microtubule-associated protein 2 and myelin basic protein. The current studies examined whether ERK1 and/or ERK2 was present in T cells and whether they were phosphorylated and activated as a consequence of T cell activation. The data demonstrated that both ERK1 and ERK2 were present in Jurkat cells and peripheral blood T cells. In T cells ERK2 was more prevalent than ERK1. The concentrations of ERK1 and ERK2 were not altered by stimulating the cells for 16 h with immobilized anti-CD3 mAb or anti-CD3 mAb and phorbol myristate acetate, mAb to CD3 and phorbol myristate acetate stimulated an increase in ERK1 and ERK2 MBP kinase activity. Anti-CD3 mAb triggered an increase their phosphate content which was detectable at 2 min but reached a maximum at 5 min. A portion of the increase in phosphate was caused by an increase in phosphotyrosine. We also examined the rate of ERK2 degradation. ERK2 was stable for up to 36 h, and its degradation was unaffected by the activation state of the cells. The data demonstrate that ERK1 and ERK2 are part of an anti-CD3 mAb-stimulated signal transduction cascade that is downstream of protein kinase C and, therefore, suggest that these kinases play an important role m T cell activation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3230-3237
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Immunology
Volume148
Issue number10
StatePublished - 1992

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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