Eye Tracking Dysfunction in Schizophrenia: Characterization of Component Eye Movement Abnormalities, Diagnostic Specificity, and the Role of Attention

John A. Sweeney, Brett A. Clementz, Gretchen L. Haas, Michael D. Escobar, Karl Drake, Allen J. Frances

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

75 Scopus citations

Abstract

To characterize oculomotor components and diagnostic specificity of eye tracking abnormalities in schizophrenia, we examined a large consecutively admitted series of psychotic patients and matched controls. The most common abnormality in schizophrenic patients was low gain (slow) pursuit eye movements (47% of cases). Pursuit and saccadic eye movement abnormalities were no more severe in schizophrenic Ss than in those with affective psychoses, except that high rates of catch-up saccades were unique to schizophrenic Ss (17% of cases). These findings indicate that impaired pursuit eye movements are a major cause of eye tracking impairments in schizophrenia, that tracking dysfunctions commonly occur in affective psychoses, and that markedly high rates of catch-up saccades during eye tracking may be specific to schizophrenia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)222-230
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Abnormal Psychology
Volume103
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - May 1994

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Biological Psychiatry

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