Facilitation of memory performance through induced sematic processing in survivors of severe closed-head injury

F. C. Goldstein, H. S. Levin, C. Boake, J. H. Lohrey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

45 Scopus citations

Abstract

This study examined whether survivors of severe closed-head injury (CHI) show a relative benefit in memory for words that are processed semantically versus words that are processed physically or acoustically. Sixteen long-term CHI patients and 14 demographically matched controls were administered a Levels of Processing paradigm involving detection of semantic (categorical), physical (letter), or acoustic (rhyme) features of to-be-remembered words. Semantic processing enhanced recognition memory and cued recall in the CHI patients, but the degree of facilitation was reduced relative to controls. The results indicate that attention to semantic features facilitates memory performance in survivors but may require greater cognitive effort. Implications for the remediation of memory impairments following CHI are discussed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)286-300
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 1990

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Neurology
  • Clinical Neurology

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