Factors Associated with Depression Among Mexican Americans Living in U.S.–Mexico Border and Non-Border Areas

Patrice A C Vaeth, Raul Caetano, Britain A. Mills

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

3 Scopus citations

Abstract

Factors associated with CES-D depression among Mexican Americans living on and off the U.S.–Mexico border are examined. Data are from two studies of Mexican American adults. The Border Survey conducted face-to-face interviews in urban U.S.–Mexico border counties of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas (N = 1307). The non-border HABLAS survey conducted face-to-face interviews in Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, and Miami (N = 1288). Both surveys used a multistage cluster sample design with response rates of 67 and 76 %, respectively. The multivariate analysis showed that border residence and higher perceived neighborhood collective efficacy were protective for depression among men. Among men, lower education, unemployment, increased weekly drinking, and poor health status were associated with depression. Among women, alcohol-related problems and poorer health status were also associated with depression. Further examinations of how neighborhood perceptions vary by gender and how these perceptions influence the likelihood of depression are warranted.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)718-727
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Immigrant and Minority Health
Volume18
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2016

Keywords

  • Depression
  • Mexican Americans
  • Neighborhood
  • Perceived collective efficacy
  • U.S.–Mexico border

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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