Factors Associated With Symptomatic Rotator Cuff Tears: The Rotator Cuff Outcomes Workgroup Cohort Study

Alan Z. Grusky, Amos Song, Peter Kim, Gregory D. Ayers, Laurence D. Higgins, John E. Kuhn, Keith M. Baumgarten, Elizabeth Matzkin, Nitin B. Jain

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Although rotator cuff tear is one of the most common musculoskeletal disorders, its etiology is poorly understood. We assessed factors associated with the presence of rotator cuff tears in a cohort of patients with shoulder pain. DESIGN: From February 2011 to July 2016, a longitudinal cohort of patients with shoulder pain was recruited. Patients completed a detailed questionnaire in addition to a magnetic resonance imaging scan and a clinical shoulder evaluation. The association of multiple factors associated with rotator cuff tears was assessed using multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS: In our cohort of 266 patients, 61.3% of patients had a rotator cuff tear. Older age (per 1 yr: odds ratio = 1.03, 95% confidence interval = 1.02-1.07), involvement of the dominant shoulder (odds ratio = 2.02, 95% confidence interval = 1.16-3.52), and a higher body mass index (per 1 kg/m2: odds ratio = 1.06, 95% confidence interval = 1.03-1.12) were independently associated with rotator cuff tears. Sex, depression, smoking status, shoulder use at work, hypertension, and diabetes were not significantly associated with rotator cuff tear. CONCLUSIONS: In a cohort of patients with shoulder pain, we identified older age, involvement of the dominant shoulder, and a higher body mass index to be independently associated with rotator cuff tear. The mechanism of how these factors possibly lead to rotator cuff tears needs further research. TO CLAIM CME CREDITS: Complete the self-assessment activity and evaluation online at http://www.physiatry.org/JournalCME. CME OBJECTIVES: Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to: (1) Identify factors associated with an increased risk of developing rotator cuff tears in adults; (2) Describe the current epidemiological trends of rotator cuff tears in the United States; and (3) Discuss the pathophysiological role of aging in the development of nontraumatic rotator cuff tears.Advanced. ACCREDITATION: The Association of Academic Physiatrists is accredited by the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education to provide continuing medical education for physicians.The Association of Academic Physiatrists designates this Journal-based CME activity for a maximum of 1.0 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should only claim credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)331-336
Number of pages6
JournalAmerican journal of physical medicine & rehabilitation
Volume100
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2021

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physical Therapy, Sports Therapy and Rehabilitation
  • Rehabilitation

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