Factors influencing family physicians’ contribution to the child health care workforce

Laura A. Makaroff, Imam M. Xierali, Stephen M. Petterson, Scott A. Shipman, James C. Puffer, Andrew W. Bazemore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

PURPOSE We wanted to explore demographic and geographic factors associated with family physicians’ provision of care to children. METHODS We analyzed the proportion of family physicians providing care to children using survey data collected by the American Board of Family Medicine from 2006 to 2009. Using a cross-sectional study design and logistic regression analysis, we examined the association of various physician demographic and geographic factors and providing care of children. RESULTS Younger age, female sex, and rural location are positive predictors of family physicians providing care to children: odds ratio (OR) = 0.97 (95% CI, 0.97-0.98), 1.19 (1.12-1.25), and 1.50 (1.39-1.62), respectively. Family physicians practicing in a partnership are more likely to provide care to children than those in group practice: OR = 1.53 (95% CI, 1.40-1.68). Family physicians practicing in areas with higher density of children are more likely to provide care to children: OR = 1.04 (95% CI, 1.03-1.05), while those in high-poverty areas are less likely 0.10 (95% CI, 0.10-0.10). Family physicians located in areas with no pediatricians are more likely to provide care to children than those in areas with higher pediatrician density: OR = 1.80 (95% CI, 1.59-2.01). CONCLUSIONS Various demographic and geographic factors influence the likeli-hood of family physicians providing care to children, findings that have important implications to policy efforts aimed at ensuring access to care for children.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)427-431
Number of pages5
JournalAnnals of family medicine
Volume12
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Health Manpower
Family Physicians
Child Care
Delivery of Health Care
Geography
Odds Ratio
Demography
Poverty Areas
Child Health
Group Practice
Cross-Sectional Studies
Logistic Models
Regression Analysis
Medicine
Physicians

Keywords

  • Children
  • Family physicians
  • Pediatrics
  • Workforce

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Family Practice

Cite this

Makaroff, L. A., Xierali, I. M., Petterson, S. M., Shipman, S. A., Puffer, J. C., & Bazemore, A. W. (2014). Factors influencing family physicians’ contribution to the child health care workforce. Annals of family medicine, 12(5), 427-431. https://doi.org/10.1370/afm.1689

Factors influencing family physicians’ contribution to the child health care workforce. / Makaroff, Laura A.; Xierali, Imam M.; Petterson, Stephen M.; Shipman, Scott A.; Puffer, James C.; Bazemore, Andrew W.

In: Annals of family medicine, Vol. 12, No. 5, 01.01.2014, p. 427-431.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Makaroff, LA, Xierali, IM, Petterson, SM, Shipman, SA, Puffer, JC & Bazemore, AW 2014, 'Factors influencing family physicians’ contribution to the child health care workforce', Annals of family medicine, vol. 12, no. 5, pp. 427-431. https://doi.org/10.1370/afm.1689
Makaroff, Laura A. ; Xierali, Imam M. ; Petterson, Stephen M. ; Shipman, Scott A. ; Puffer, James C. ; Bazemore, Andrew W. / Factors influencing family physicians’ contribution to the child health care workforce. In: Annals of family medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 12, No. 5. pp. 427-431.
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