Factors Influencing Likelihood of Voice Therapy Attendance

Stephanie Misono, Schelomo Marmor, Nelson Roy, Ted Mau, Seth M. Cohen

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective To identify factors associated with the likelihood of attending voice therapy among patients referred for it in the CHEER (Creating Healthcare Excellence through Education and Research) practice-based research network infrastructure. Study Design Prospectively enrolled cross-sectional study. Setting CHEER network of community and academic sites. Methods Data were collected on patient-reported demographics, voice-related diagnoses, voice-related handicap (Voice Handicap Index-10), likelihood of attending voice therapy (VT), and opinions on factors influencing likelihood of attending VT. The relationships between patient characteristics/opinions and likelihood of attending VT were investigated. Results A total of 170 patients with various voice-related diagnoses reported receiving a recommendation for VT. Of those, 85% indicated that they were likely to attend it, regardless of voice-related handicap severity. The most common factors influencing likelihood of VT attendance were insurance/copay, relief that it was not cancer, and travel. Those who were not likely to attend VT identified, as important factors, unclear potential improvement, not understanding the purpose of therapy, and concern that it would be too hard. In multivariate analysis, factors associated with greater likelihood of attending VT included shorter travel distance, age (40-59 years), and being seen in an academic practice. Conclusions Most patients reported plans to attend VT as recommended. Patients who intended to attend VT reported different considerations in their decision making from those who did not plan to attend. These findings may inform patient counseling and efforts to increase access to voice care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)518-524
Number of pages7
JournalOtolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States)
Volume156
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2017

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Therapeutics
Research
Delivery of Health Care
Education
Insurance
Counseling
Decision Making
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Demography
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • barriers
  • CHEER
  • speech therapy
  • voice problems
  • voice therapy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Factors Influencing Likelihood of Voice Therapy Attendance. / Misono, Stephanie; Marmor, Schelomo; Roy, Nelson; Mau, Ted; Cohen, Seth M.

In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States), Vol. 156, No. 3, 01.03.2017, p. 518-524.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Misono, Stephanie ; Marmor, Schelomo ; Roy, Nelson ; Mau, Ted ; Cohen, Seth M. / Factors Influencing Likelihood of Voice Therapy Attendance. In: Otolaryngology - Head and Neck Surgery (United States). 2017 ; Vol. 156, No. 3. pp. 518-524.
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