Factors that influence adherence with disease-modifying therapy in MS

Katherine Treadaway, Gary Cutter, Amber Salter, Sharon Lynch, James Simsarian, John Corboy, Douglas Jeffery, Bruce Cohen, Ken Mankowski, Joseph Guarnaccia, Lawrence Schaeffer, Roy Kanter, David Brandes, Charles Kaufman, David Duncan, Ellen J Marder, Arthur Allen, John Harney, Joanna Cooper, Douglas WooOlaf Stuve, Michael Racke, Elliot Frohman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

172 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background : The complexity and cost of injection treatment can represent a formidable challenge for patients affected by a chronic illness, particularly those whose treatment is primarily preventative and only modestly effective on the more conspicuous symptomatic aspects of the disease process. The aim of this investigation was to identify which factors most influenced nonadherent behavior with the available diseasemodifying injection therapies for multiple sclerosis (MS). Methods : A multicenter, observational (threewave) study using surveys was developed and administered to patients with MS through the World Wide Web. Healthcare providers at 17 neurology clinics recruited patients for the study. Results : A total of 798 patients responded to the baseline wave of the study (708 responded to all three waves). The nonadherence rates for all patients (missing one or more injections) across these waves remained relatively stable at 39 %, 37 %, and 36 %, respectively. The most common reason participants listed for missing injections was that they simply forgot to administer the medication (58 %). Other factors including injection-site reactions, quality of life, patients' perceptions on the injectable medications, hope, depression, and support were also assessed in relation to adherence. Conclusions : This study characterizes factors that are associated with failure to fully adhere with disease modifying injection therapy for MS and underscores the principles associated with optimizing adherence and its implications for effective treatment of the disease process in MS.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)568-576
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Neurology
Volume256
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2009

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Multiple Sclerosis
Injections
Therapeutics
Neurology
Health Personnel
Health Care Costs
Observational Studies
Chronic Disease
Quality of Life

Keywords

  • Adherence
  • Compliance
  • Disease
  • Injections
  • Modifying therapy
  • Multiple sclerosis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology
  • Neurology

Cite this

Treadaway, K., Cutter, G., Salter, A., Lynch, S., Simsarian, J., Corboy, J., ... Frohman, E. (2009). Factors that influence adherence with disease-modifying therapy in MS. Journal of Neurology, 256(4), 568-576. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-009-0096-y

Factors that influence adherence with disease-modifying therapy in MS. / Treadaway, Katherine; Cutter, Gary; Salter, Amber; Lynch, Sharon; Simsarian, James; Corboy, John; Jeffery, Douglas; Cohen, Bruce; Mankowski, Ken; Guarnaccia, Joseph; Schaeffer, Lawrence; Kanter, Roy; Brandes, David; Kaufman, Charles; Duncan, David; Marder, Ellen J; Allen, Arthur; Harney, John; Cooper, Joanna; Woo, Douglas; Stuve, Olaf; Racke, Michael; Frohman, Elliot.

In: Journal of Neurology, Vol. 256, No. 4, 04.2009, p. 568-576.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Treadaway, K, Cutter, G, Salter, A, Lynch, S, Simsarian, J, Corboy, J, Jeffery, D, Cohen, B, Mankowski, K, Guarnaccia, J, Schaeffer, L, Kanter, R, Brandes, D, Kaufman, C, Duncan, D, Marder, EJ, Allen, A, Harney, J, Cooper, J, Woo, D, Stuve, O, Racke, M & Frohman, E 2009, 'Factors that influence adherence with disease-modifying therapy in MS', Journal of Neurology, vol. 256, no. 4, pp. 568-576. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-009-0096-y
Treadaway K, Cutter G, Salter A, Lynch S, Simsarian J, Corboy J et al. Factors that influence adherence with disease-modifying therapy in MS. Journal of Neurology. 2009 Apr;256(4):568-576. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00415-009-0096-y
Treadaway, Katherine ; Cutter, Gary ; Salter, Amber ; Lynch, Sharon ; Simsarian, James ; Corboy, John ; Jeffery, Douglas ; Cohen, Bruce ; Mankowski, Ken ; Guarnaccia, Joseph ; Schaeffer, Lawrence ; Kanter, Roy ; Brandes, David ; Kaufman, Charles ; Duncan, David ; Marder, Ellen J ; Allen, Arthur ; Harney, John ; Cooper, Joanna ; Woo, Douglas ; Stuve, Olaf ; Racke, Michael ; Frohman, Elliot. / Factors that influence adherence with disease-modifying therapy in MS. In: Journal of Neurology. 2009 ; Vol. 256, No. 4. pp. 568-576.
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AU - Jeffery, Douglas

AU - Cohen, Bruce

AU - Mankowski, Ken

AU - Guarnaccia, Joseph

AU - Schaeffer, Lawrence

AU - Kanter, Roy

AU - Brandes, David

AU - Kaufman, Charles

AU - Duncan, David

AU - Marder, Ellen J

AU - Allen, Arthur

AU - Harney, John

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