Family history of chronic disease and meeting public health guidelines for physical activity: The cooper center longitudinal study

Kerem Shuval, Chung Yi Chiu, Carolyn E. Barlow, Kelley Pettee Gabriel, Darla E. Kendzor, Michael S. Businelle, Celette Sugg Skinner, Bijal A. Balasubramanian

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We aimed to assess whether a family history of coronary heart disease, diabetes, or cancer is linked to meeting public health guidelines for health-promoting physical activity. To achieve this objective, we analyzed data on 29,513 adults who came to the Cooper Clinic (Dallas, Texas) between January 1, 1990, and December 31, 2010, for a preventive medicine visit. Patients completed a comprehensive medical survey including information on family medical history, physical activity, and other lifestyle behaviors. Bivariate and multivariate logistic regression were used to examine the relationship between having a family history of chronic disease and meeting physical activity guidelines. The results indicated that individuals with a family history of disease had reduced odds for meeting or exceeding physical activity guidelines. For example, participants with a family history of 3 diseases were 36% less likely to meet or exceed physical activity guidelines than their counterparts without a family history of disease (odds ratio, 0.64; 95% CI, 0.58-0.72), while controlling for covariates. Among this large sample of adults, those with a family history of chronic disease were less inclined to regularly engage in physical activity. Thus, targeted programs encouraging adoption and maintenance of health-promoting physical activity might be warranted, specifically targeting individuals with familial history of disease.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)588-592
Number of pages5
JournalMayo Clinic Proceedings
Volume88
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - 2013

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Longitudinal Studies
Chronic Disease
Public Health
Guidelines
Exercise
Medical History Taking
Preventive Medicine
Heart Neoplasms
Health
Coronary Disease
Life Style
Logistic Models
Odds Ratio

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Shuval, K., Chiu, C. Y., Barlow, C. E., Gabriel, K. P., Kendzor, D. E., Businelle, M. S., ... Balasubramanian, B. A. (2013). Family history of chronic disease and meeting public health guidelines for physical activity: The cooper center longitudinal study. Mayo Clinic Proceedings, 88(6), 588-592. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.mayocp.2013.04.006

Family history of chronic disease and meeting public health guidelines for physical activity : The cooper center longitudinal study. / Shuval, Kerem; Chiu, Chung Yi; Barlow, Carolyn E.; Gabriel, Kelley Pettee; Kendzor, Darla E.; Businelle, Michael S.; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Balasubramanian, Bijal A.

In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings, Vol. 88, No. 6, 2013, p. 588-592.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Shuval, Kerem ; Chiu, Chung Yi ; Barlow, Carolyn E. ; Gabriel, Kelley Pettee ; Kendzor, Darla E. ; Businelle, Michael S. ; Skinner, Celette Sugg ; Balasubramanian, Bijal A. / Family history of chronic disease and meeting public health guidelines for physical activity : The cooper center longitudinal study. In: Mayo Clinic Proceedings. 2013 ; Vol. 88, No. 6. pp. 588-592.
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