Feeding Systems and the Gut Microbiome: Gut-Brain Interactions With Relevance to Psychiatric Conditions

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background Physical and mental health is dependent on the environment, and feeding is a prime example of this environmental exchange. While the hypothalamus controls both feeding behavior and the stress response, the integration of the neural control centers and the peripheral gut allows for disruption in the gastrointestinal systems and dysfunctional communication to the brain. Objective The purpose of this review is to familiarize clinicians with the physiology controlling feeding behavior and its implications for psychiatric conditions, such as anorexia nervosa and depression. Growing understanding of how integrated bacterial life is in the body has shown that gut bacteria regulate basic physiologic processes and are implicated in various disease states and contribute to regulation of mood. Responses to stress have effects on feeding behavior and mood and the regulation of the stress response by the gut microbiota could contribute to the dysfunction seen in patients with psychiatric illnesses. Conclusions Gut microbiota may contribute to dysfunction in psychiatric illnesses. New opportunities to modulate existing gut microbiota using probiotics could be novel targets for clinical interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)574-580
Number of pages7
JournalPsychosomatics
Volume58
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 1 2017

Fingerprint

Feeding Behavior
Psychiatry
Brain
Anorexia Nervosa
Probiotics
Hypothalamus
Mental Health
Communication
Depression
Bacteria
Gastrointestinal Microbiome
Interaction
Mood
Illness

Keywords

  • Appetite
  • Depression
  • Eating disorders
  • Gut microbiota
  • Stress

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Applied Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Feeding Systems and the Gut Microbiome : Gut-Brain Interactions With Relevance to Psychiatric Conditions. / Mason, Brittany L.

In: Psychosomatics, Vol. 58, No. 6, 01.11.2017, p. 574-580.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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