Fibronectin and wound healing

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

244 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Critical to the continued existence of all multicellular organisms is their ability to respond to and repair traumatic injuries. In vertebrates, particularly mammals, the response to injury has been studied in great detail, and the various cells involved in wound healing have been identified (recently reviewed) . While the overall features of wound healing are now well known, many important details remain to be clarified. For instance, the biochemical signs that initiate and terminate the wound healing response are still subjects of considerable debate. Cells of the organism recognize and migrate to the wound interface, and the wound healing response persists at least until this abnormal interface is replaced by new tissue. Several years ago, I reviewed the evidence indicating that fibronectin is important in cutaneous wound healing. Since then, considerable additional information in support of this idea has been forthcoming, and it now appears that fibronectin plays numerous roles in the wound healing situation, which will be discussed in this brief review.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)107-116
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Cellular Biochemistry
Volume26
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1984

Fingerprint

Fibronectins
Wound Healing
Mammals
Repair
Tissue
Wounds and Injuries
Vertebrates
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

Fibronectin and wound healing. / Grinnell, F.

In: Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, Vol. 26, No. 2, 1984, p. 107-116.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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