Fluid transport by human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial layers in culture: A homeostatic role for aquaporin-1

Rajkumar V. Patil, Zhiqiang Han, Maimaiti Yiming, Junjie Yang, Pavel Iserovich, Martin B. Wax, Jorge Fischbarg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

25 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We report for the first time that cultured nonpigmented human ciliary epithelial (NPE) cell layers transport fluid. Cells were grown to confluence on permeable membrane inserts, and fluid transport across the resulting cell layers was determined by volume clamp at 37°C. These cell layers translocated fluid from the apical to the basal side at a steady rate of 3.6 μl·h-1·cm-2 (n=4) for 8 h. This fluid movement was independent of hydrostatic pressure and was completely inhibited by 1 mM ouabain, suggesting it arose from fluid transport. Mercuric chloride, a nonspecific but potent blocker of Hg2+-sensitive aquaporins, and aquaporin-1 antisense oligonucleotides both partially inhibited fluid transport across the cell layers, which suggests that water channels have a role in NPE cell homeostasis. In addition, these results suggest that of the two ciliary epithelial layers in tandem, the NPE layer by itself can transport fluid. This cultured layer, therefore, constitutes an interesting model that may be useful for physiological and pharmacological characterization of ciliary epithelial fluid secretion.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology
Volume281
Issue number4 50-4
StatePublished - 2001

Fingerprint

Aquaporin 1
Fluids
Aquaporins
Cells
Fluids and Secretions
Mercuric Chloride
Hydrostatic Pressure
Antisense Oligonucleotides
Ouabain
Homeostasis
Epithelial Cells
Die casting inserts
Pharmacology
Clamping devices
Hydrostatic pressure
Membranes

Keywords

  • Aquaporins
  • Aqueous humor
  • Ciliary epithelium

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology
  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Patil, R. V., Han, Z., Yiming, M., Yang, J., Iserovich, P., Wax, M. B., & Fischbarg, J. (2001). Fluid transport by human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial layers in culture: A homeostatic role for aquaporin-1. American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, 281(4 50-4).

Fluid transport by human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial layers in culture : A homeostatic role for aquaporin-1. / Patil, Rajkumar V.; Han, Zhiqiang; Yiming, Maimaiti; Yang, Junjie; Iserovich, Pavel; Wax, Martin B.; Fischbarg, Jorge.

In: American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, Vol. 281, No. 4 50-4, 2001.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Patil, RV, Han, Z, Yiming, M, Yang, J, Iserovich, P, Wax, MB & Fischbarg, J 2001, 'Fluid transport by human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial layers in culture: A homeostatic role for aquaporin-1', American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology, vol. 281, no. 4 50-4.
Patil, Rajkumar V. ; Han, Zhiqiang ; Yiming, Maimaiti ; Yang, Junjie ; Iserovich, Pavel ; Wax, Martin B. ; Fischbarg, Jorge. / Fluid transport by human nonpigmented ciliary epithelial layers in culture : A homeostatic role for aquaporin-1. In: American Journal of Physiology - Cell Physiology. 2001 ; Vol. 281, No. 4 50-4.
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