Fluoride bioavailability from slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate

Charles Y C Pak, Khashayar Sakhaee, Carol Parcel, John Poindexter, Beverley Adams, Abdillahi Bahar, Robert Beckley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Clinical pharmacology of slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate was examined in acute and long-term studies. Following a single oral administration of 50 mg slow-release sodium fluoride, a peak serum fluoride concentration (Cmax) of 184 ng/ml was reached in 2 h; thereafter, serum fluoride concentration declined with a T1/2 of 5.9 h. The concurrent administration of calcium citrate (400 mg calcium) gave an equivalent Tmax (time required to attain Cmax) and T1/2, but a lower Cmax of 135 ng/ml. The coadministration of a meal with fluoride also reduced Cmax but increased Tmax. The area under the serum concentration curve of slow-release sodium fluoride was reduced 17-27% by a meal or calcium citrate. Thus, calcium citrate reduced fluoride absorption and peak fluoride concentration in serum of slow-release sodium fluoride but did not affect the time required to reach peak concentration or the rate of subsequent decline. The effect of a meal was similar, except for a longer period required to reach peak serum concentration. During long-term administration of 25 mg slow-release sodium fluoride coadministered with 400 mg calcium as calcium citrate on a twice daily schedule, the trough level of serum fluoride could be kept between 95 and 190 ng/ml, believed to be the therapeutic window.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)857-862
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Bone and Mineral Research
Volume5
Issue number8
StatePublished - Aug 1990

Fingerprint

Calcium Citrate
Sodium Fluoride
Fluorides
Biological Availability
Serum
Meals
Calcium
Clinical Pharmacology
Oral Administration
Appointments and Schedules

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Fluoride bioavailability from slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate. / Pak, Charles Y C; Sakhaee, Khashayar; Parcel, Carol; Poindexter, John; Adams, Beverley; Bahar, Abdillahi; Beckley, Robert.

In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, Vol. 5, No. 8, 08.1990, p. 857-862.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pak, CYC, Sakhaee, K, Parcel, C, Poindexter, J, Adams, B, Bahar, A & Beckley, R 1990, 'Fluoride bioavailability from slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate', Journal of Bone and Mineral Research, vol. 5, no. 8, pp. 857-862.
Pak, Charles Y C ; Sakhaee, Khashayar ; Parcel, Carol ; Poindexter, John ; Adams, Beverley ; Bahar, Abdillahi ; Beckley, Robert. / Fluoride bioavailability from slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate. In: Journal of Bone and Mineral Research. 1990 ; Vol. 5, No. 8. pp. 857-862.
@article{1910cf8ec36d403392662936a7885283,
title = "Fluoride bioavailability from slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate",
abstract = "Clinical pharmacology of slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate was examined in acute and long-term studies. Following a single oral administration of 50 mg slow-release sodium fluoride, a peak serum fluoride concentration (Cmax) of 184 ng/ml was reached in 2 h; thereafter, serum fluoride concentration declined with a T1/2 of 5.9 h. The concurrent administration of calcium citrate (400 mg calcium) gave an equivalent Tmax (time required to attain Cmax) and T1/2, but a lower Cmax of 135 ng/ml. The coadministration of a meal with fluoride also reduced Cmax but increased Tmax. The area under the serum concentration curve of slow-release sodium fluoride was reduced 17-27{\%} by a meal or calcium citrate. Thus, calcium citrate reduced fluoride absorption and peak fluoride concentration in serum of slow-release sodium fluoride but did not affect the time required to reach peak concentration or the rate of subsequent decline. The effect of a meal was similar, except for a longer period required to reach peak serum concentration. During long-term administration of 25 mg slow-release sodium fluoride coadministered with 400 mg calcium as calcium citrate on a twice daily schedule, the trough level of serum fluoride could be kept between 95 and 190 ng/ml, believed to be the therapeutic window.",
author = "Pak, {Charles Y C} and Khashayar Sakhaee and Carol Parcel and John Poindexter and Beverley Adams and Abdillahi Bahar and Robert Beckley",
year = "1990",
month = "8",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "5",
pages = "857--862",
journal = "Journal of Bone and Mineral Research",
issn = "0884-0431",
publisher = "Wiley-Blackwell",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Fluoride bioavailability from slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate

AU - Pak, Charles Y C

AU - Sakhaee, Khashayar

AU - Parcel, Carol

AU - Poindexter, John

AU - Adams, Beverley

AU - Bahar, Abdillahi

AU - Beckley, Robert

PY - 1990/8

Y1 - 1990/8

N2 - Clinical pharmacology of slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate was examined in acute and long-term studies. Following a single oral administration of 50 mg slow-release sodium fluoride, a peak serum fluoride concentration (Cmax) of 184 ng/ml was reached in 2 h; thereafter, serum fluoride concentration declined with a T1/2 of 5.9 h. The concurrent administration of calcium citrate (400 mg calcium) gave an equivalent Tmax (time required to attain Cmax) and T1/2, but a lower Cmax of 135 ng/ml. The coadministration of a meal with fluoride also reduced Cmax but increased Tmax. The area under the serum concentration curve of slow-release sodium fluoride was reduced 17-27% by a meal or calcium citrate. Thus, calcium citrate reduced fluoride absorption and peak fluoride concentration in serum of slow-release sodium fluoride but did not affect the time required to reach peak concentration or the rate of subsequent decline. The effect of a meal was similar, except for a longer period required to reach peak serum concentration. During long-term administration of 25 mg slow-release sodium fluoride coadministered with 400 mg calcium as calcium citrate on a twice daily schedule, the trough level of serum fluoride could be kept between 95 and 190 ng/ml, believed to be the therapeutic window.

AB - Clinical pharmacology of slow-release sodium fluoride given with calcium citrate was examined in acute and long-term studies. Following a single oral administration of 50 mg slow-release sodium fluoride, a peak serum fluoride concentration (Cmax) of 184 ng/ml was reached in 2 h; thereafter, serum fluoride concentration declined with a T1/2 of 5.9 h. The concurrent administration of calcium citrate (400 mg calcium) gave an equivalent Tmax (time required to attain Cmax) and T1/2, but a lower Cmax of 135 ng/ml. The coadministration of a meal with fluoride also reduced Cmax but increased Tmax. The area under the serum concentration curve of slow-release sodium fluoride was reduced 17-27% by a meal or calcium citrate. Thus, calcium citrate reduced fluoride absorption and peak fluoride concentration in serum of slow-release sodium fluoride but did not affect the time required to reach peak concentration or the rate of subsequent decline. The effect of a meal was similar, except for a longer period required to reach peak serum concentration. During long-term administration of 25 mg slow-release sodium fluoride coadministered with 400 mg calcium as calcium citrate on a twice daily schedule, the trough level of serum fluoride could be kept between 95 and 190 ng/ml, believed to be the therapeutic window.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0025178942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0025178942&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 2239370

AN - SCOPUS:0025178942

VL - 5

SP - 857

EP - 862

JO - Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

JF - Journal of Bone and Mineral Research

SN - 0884-0431

IS - 8

ER -