Food allergen panel testing often results in misdiagnosis of food allergy

J. Andrew Bird, Maria Crain, Pooja Varshney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective To determine the utility of food allergy panel testing among patients referred to a pediatric food allergy center. Study design Retrospective chart review of all new patients seen between September 2011 and December 2012 by 1 provider in a tertiary referral pediatric food allergy center. A cost analysis was performed to calculate the estimated cost of evaluation for patients who have received a food allergy panel. Results Of 797 new patient encounters, 284 (35%) patients had received a food allergy panel. Only 90 (32.8%) individuals had a history warranting evaluation for food allergy; 126 individuals were avoiding a food baased on recommendations from the referring provider and 112 (88.9%) were able to re-introduce at least 1 food into their diet. The positive predictive value of food allergy panel testing in this unselected population was 2.2%. The estimated cost of evaluation for this population was $79 412. Conclusions Food allergy panel testing often results in misdiagnosis of food allergy, overly restrictive dietary avoidance, and an unnecessary economic burden on the health system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)97-100.e1
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume166
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Keywords

  • AD Atopic dermatitis
  • NIAID National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases
  • PPV Positive predictive value

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

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