Forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during handgrip exercise in humans

Daisaku Michikami, Atsunori Kamiya, Qi Fu, Yuki Niimi, Satoshi Iwase, Tadaaki Mano, Akio Suzumura

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Although angina pectoris in patients with coronary heart disease often occurs when their forearms are in an elevated position for a prolonged period, and sympathetic activation is a major cause of this condition, little is known about the physiological effects of forearm elevation on sympathetic activity during forearm exercise. We hypothesized that forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during the static handgrip exercise in humans. A total of 10 healthy male volunteers performed 2 min of static handgrip exercise at 30% of maximal voluntary contraction followed by 2 min of post-exercise muscle ischaemia (PEMI; specific activation of the muscle metaboreflex) with two forearm positions: the exercising forearm was elevated 50 cm above the heart (forearm-elevated trial) or fixed at the level of the heart (heart-level trial). Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA), blood pressure and heart rate were monitored. MSNA increased during handgrip exercise in both forearm positions (P < 0.001); the increase was 51% greater in the forearm-elevated trial (516±99 arbitrary units) than in the heart-level trial (346±44 units; P < 0.05). The increase in mean blood pressure was 8.4 mmHg greater during exercise in the forearm-elevated trial (P < 0.05), while changes in heart rate were similar in both forearm positions. The increase in MSNA during PEMI was 71% greater in the forearm-elevated trial (393±71 arbitrary units/min) than in the heart-level trial (229±29 units/min; P < 0.05). These results support the hypothesis that forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during handgrip exercise. The excitatory effect of forearm elevation on exercising MSNA may be mediated primarily by increased activation of the muscle metaboreflex.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)295-301
Number of pages7
JournalClinical Science
Volume103
Issue number3
StatePublished - Sep 2002

Fingerprint

Forearm
Exercise
Muscles
Heart Rate
Blood Pressure
Angina Pectoris
Coronary Disease
Healthy Volunteers
Ischemia

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular system
  • Microneurography
  • Muscle reflex
  • Muscle sympathetic nerve activity
  • Static exercise
  • Sympathetic nervous system

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Michikami, D., Kamiya, A., Fu, Q., Niimi, Y., Iwase, S., Mano, T., & Suzumura, A. (2002). Forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during handgrip exercise in humans. Clinical Science, 103(3), 295-301.

Forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during handgrip exercise in humans. / Michikami, Daisaku; Kamiya, Atsunori; Fu, Qi; Niimi, Yuki; Iwase, Satoshi; Mano, Tadaaki; Suzumura, Akio.

In: Clinical Science, Vol. 103, No. 3, 09.2002, p. 295-301.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Michikami, D, Kamiya, A, Fu, Q, Niimi, Y, Iwase, S, Mano, T & Suzumura, A 2002, 'Forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during handgrip exercise in humans', Clinical Science, vol. 103, no. 3, pp. 295-301.
Michikami D, Kamiya A, Fu Q, Niimi Y, Iwase S, Mano T et al. Forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during handgrip exercise in humans. Clinical Science. 2002 Sep;103(3):295-301.
Michikami, Daisaku ; Kamiya, Atsunori ; Fu, Qi ; Niimi, Yuki ; Iwase, Satoshi ; Mano, Tadaaki ; Suzumura, Akio. / Forearm elevation augments sympathetic activation during handgrip exercise in humans. In: Clinical Science. 2002 ; Vol. 103, No. 3. pp. 295-301.
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