FoxA transcription factor Fork head maintains the intestinal stem/progenitor cell identities in Drosophila

Qing Lan, Min Cao, Rahul K. Kollipara, Jeffrey B. Rosa, Ralf Kittler, Huaqi Jiang

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Scopus citations

Abstract

Understanding how somatic stem cells respond to tissue needs is important, since aberrant somatic stem cell behaviors may lead to tissue degeneration or tumorigenesis. Here, from an in vivo RNAi screen targeting transcription factors that regulate intestinal regeneration, we uncovered a requirement for the Drosophila FoxA transcription factor Fork head (Fkh) in the maintenance of intestinal stem/progenitor cell identities. FoxA/Fkh maintains the expressions of stem/progenitor cell markers and is required for stem cell proliferation during intestinal homeostasis and regeneration. Furthermore, FoxA/Fkh prevents the intestinal stem/progenitor cells from precocious differentiation into the Enterocyte lineage, likely in cooperation with the transcription factor bHLH/Daughterless (Da). In addition, loss of FoxA/Fkh suppresses the intestinal tumorigenesis caused by Notch pathway inactivation. To reveal the gene program underlying stem/progenitor cell identities, we profiled the genome-wide chromatin binding sites of transcription factors Fkh and Da, and interestingly, around half of Fkh binding regions are shared by Da, further suggesting their collaborative roles. Finally, we identified the genes associated with their shared binding regions. This comprehensive gene list may contain stem/progenitor maintenance factors functioning downstream of Fkh and Da, and would be helpful for future gene discoveries in the Drosophila intestinal stem cell lineage.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalDevelopmental Biology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - May 13 2017

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

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