Fragmentation and unpredictability of early-life experience in mental disorders

Tallie Z. Baram, Elysia P. Davis, Andre Obenaus, Curt A. Sandman, Steven L. Small, Ana Solodkin, Hal Stern

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

114 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Maternal sensory signals in early life play a crucial role in programming the structure and function of the developing brain, promoting vulnerability or resilience to emotional and cognitive disorders. In rodent models of early-life stress, fragmentation and unpredictability of maternally derived sensory signals provoke persistent cognitive and emotional dysfunction in offspring. Similar variability and inconsistency of maternal signals during both gestation and early postnatal human life may influence development of emotional and cognitive functions, including those that underlie later depression and anxiety.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)907-915
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Journal of Psychiatry
Volume169
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2012
Externally publishedYes

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Mental Disorders
Mothers
Psychological Stress
Cognition
Rodentia
Anxiety
Depression
Pregnancy
Brain
Cognitive Dysfunction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health

Cite this

Fragmentation and unpredictability of early-life experience in mental disorders. / Baram, Tallie Z.; Davis, Elysia P.; Obenaus, Andre; Sandman, Curt A.; Small, Steven L.; Solodkin, Ana; Stern, Hal.

In: American Journal of Psychiatry, Vol. 169, No. 9, 01.08.2012, p. 907-915.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Baram, TZ, Davis, EP, Obenaus, A, Sandman, CA, Small, SL, Solodkin, A & Stern, H 2012, 'Fragmentation and unpredictability of early-life experience in mental disorders', American Journal of Psychiatry, vol. 169, no. 9, pp. 907-915. https://doi.org/10.1176/appi.ajp.2012.11091347
Baram, Tallie Z. ; Davis, Elysia P. ; Obenaus, Andre ; Sandman, Curt A. ; Small, Steven L. ; Solodkin, Ana ; Stern, Hal. / Fragmentation and unpredictability of early-life experience in mental disorders. In: American Journal of Psychiatry. 2012 ; Vol. 169, No. 9. pp. 907-915.
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