Frequency of the cholesteryl ester storage disease common LIPA E8SJM mutation (c.894G>A) in various racial and ethnic groups

Stuart A. Scott, Benny Liu, Irina Nazarenko, Suparna Martis, Julia Kozlitina, Yao Yang, Charina Ramirez, Yumi Kasai, Tommy Hyatt, Inga Peter, Robert J. Desnick

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Abstract

Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman disease are autosomal recessive later-onset and severe infantile disorders, respectively, which result from the deficient activity of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). LAL is encoded by LIPA (10q23.31) and the most common mutation associated with CESD is an exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A; E8SJM), which expresses only ∼3%-5% of normally spliced LAL. However, the frequency of c.894G>A is unknown in most populations. To estimate the prevalence of CESD in different populations, the frequencies of the c.894G>A mutation were determined in 10,000 LIPA alleles from healthy African-American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic, and Ashkenazi Jewish individuals from the greater New York metropolitan area and 6,578 LIPA alleles from African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study. The combined c.894G>A allele frequencies from the two cohorts ranged from 0.0005 (Asian) to 0.0017 (Caucasian and Hispanic), which translated to carrier frequencies of 1 in 1,000 to ∼1 in 300, respectively. No African-American heterozygotes were detected. Additionally, by surveying the available literature, c.894G>A was estimated to account for 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51%-69%) of reported mutations among multiethnic CESD patients. Using this estimate, the predicted prevalence of CESD in the Caucasian and Hispanic populations is ∼0.8 per 100,000 (∼1 in 130,000; 95% CI: ∼1 in 90,000 to 1 in 170,000). Conclusion: These data indicate that CESD may be underdiagnosed in the general Caucasian and Hispanic populations, which is important since clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy for LAL deficiency are currently being developed. Moreover, future studies on CESD prevalence in African and Asian populations may require full-gene LIPA sequencing to determine heterozygote frequencies, since c.894G>A is not common in these racial groups. (HEPATOLOGY 2013;53:958-965).

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)958-965
Number of pages8
JournalHepatology
Volume58
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2013

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Cholesterol Ester Storage Disease
Ethnic Groups
Hispanic Americans
Mutation
Sterol Esterase
African Americans
Population
Heterozygote
Wolman Disease
Alleles
Confidence Intervals
Enzyme Replacement Therapy
Gene Frequency
Exons
Clinical Trials

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Hepatology

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Frequency of the cholesteryl ester storage disease common LIPA E8SJM mutation (c.894G>A) in various racial and ethnic groups. / Scott, Stuart A.; Liu, Benny; Nazarenko, Irina; Martis, Suparna; Kozlitina, Julia; Yang, Yao; Ramirez, Charina; Kasai, Yumi; Hyatt, Tommy; Peter, Inga; Desnick, Robert J.

In: Hepatology, Vol. 58, No. 3, 09.2013, p. 958-965.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Scott, SA, Liu, B, Nazarenko, I, Martis, S, Kozlitina, J, Yang, Y, Ramirez, C, Kasai, Y, Hyatt, T, Peter, I & Desnick, RJ 2013, 'Frequency of the cholesteryl ester storage disease common LIPA E8SJM mutation (c.894G>A) in various racial and ethnic groups', Hepatology, vol. 58, no. 3, pp. 958-965. https://doi.org/10.1002/hep.26327
Scott, Stuart A. ; Liu, Benny ; Nazarenko, Irina ; Martis, Suparna ; Kozlitina, Julia ; Yang, Yao ; Ramirez, Charina ; Kasai, Yumi ; Hyatt, Tommy ; Peter, Inga ; Desnick, Robert J. / Frequency of the cholesteryl ester storage disease common LIPA E8SJM mutation (c.894G>A) in various racial and ethnic groups. In: Hepatology. 2013 ; Vol. 58, No. 3. pp. 958-965.
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abstract = "Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman disease are autosomal recessive later-onset and severe infantile disorders, respectively, which result from the deficient activity of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). LAL is encoded by LIPA (10q23.31) and the most common mutation associated with CESD is an exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A; E8SJM), which expresses only ∼3{\%}-5{\%} of normally spliced LAL. However, the frequency of c.894G>A is unknown in most populations. To estimate the prevalence of CESD in different populations, the frequencies of the c.894G>A mutation were determined in 10,000 LIPA alleles from healthy African-American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic, and Ashkenazi Jewish individuals from the greater New York metropolitan area and 6,578 LIPA alleles from African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study. The combined c.894G>A allele frequencies from the two cohorts ranged from 0.0005 (Asian) to 0.0017 (Caucasian and Hispanic), which translated to carrier frequencies of 1 in 1,000 to ∼1 in 300, respectively. No African-American heterozygotes were detected. Additionally, by surveying the available literature, c.894G>A was estimated to account for 60{\%} (95{\%} confidence interval [CI]: 51{\%}-69{\%}) of reported mutations among multiethnic CESD patients. Using this estimate, the predicted prevalence of CESD in the Caucasian and Hispanic populations is ∼0.8 per 100,000 (∼1 in 130,000; 95{\%} CI: ∼1 in 90,000 to 1 in 170,000). Conclusion: These data indicate that CESD may be underdiagnosed in the general Caucasian and Hispanic populations, which is important since clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy for LAL deficiency are currently being developed. Moreover, future studies on CESD prevalence in African and Asian populations may require full-gene LIPA sequencing to determine heterozygote frequencies, since c.894G>A is not common in these racial groups. (HEPATOLOGY 2013;53:958-965).",
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AU - Liu, Benny

AU - Nazarenko, Irina

AU - Martis, Suparna

AU - Kozlitina, Julia

AU - Yang, Yao

AU - Ramirez, Charina

AU - Kasai, Yumi

AU - Hyatt, Tommy

AU - Peter, Inga

AU - Desnick, Robert J.

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N2 - Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman disease are autosomal recessive later-onset and severe infantile disorders, respectively, which result from the deficient activity of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). LAL is encoded by LIPA (10q23.31) and the most common mutation associated with CESD is an exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A; E8SJM), which expresses only ∼3%-5% of normally spliced LAL. However, the frequency of c.894G>A is unknown in most populations. To estimate the prevalence of CESD in different populations, the frequencies of the c.894G>A mutation were determined in 10,000 LIPA alleles from healthy African-American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic, and Ashkenazi Jewish individuals from the greater New York metropolitan area and 6,578 LIPA alleles from African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study. The combined c.894G>A allele frequencies from the two cohorts ranged from 0.0005 (Asian) to 0.0017 (Caucasian and Hispanic), which translated to carrier frequencies of 1 in 1,000 to ∼1 in 300, respectively. No African-American heterozygotes were detected. Additionally, by surveying the available literature, c.894G>A was estimated to account for 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51%-69%) of reported mutations among multiethnic CESD patients. Using this estimate, the predicted prevalence of CESD in the Caucasian and Hispanic populations is ∼0.8 per 100,000 (∼1 in 130,000; 95% CI: ∼1 in 90,000 to 1 in 170,000). Conclusion: These data indicate that CESD may be underdiagnosed in the general Caucasian and Hispanic populations, which is important since clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy for LAL deficiency are currently being developed. Moreover, future studies on CESD prevalence in African and Asian populations may require full-gene LIPA sequencing to determine heterozygote frequencies, since c.894G>A is not common in these racial groups. (HEPATOLOGY 2013;53:958-965).

AB - Cholesteryl ester storage disease (CESD) and Wolman disease are autosomal recessive later-onset and severe infantile disorders, respectively, which result from the deficient activity of lysosomal acid lipase (LAL). LAL is encoded by LIPA (10q23.31) and the most common mutation associated with CESD is an exon 8 splice junction mutation (c.894G>A; E8SJM), which expresses only ∼3%-5% of normally spliced LAL. However, the frequency of c.894G>A is unknown in most populations. To estimate the prevalence of CESD in different populations, the frequencies of the c.894G>A mutation were determined in 10,000 LIPA alleles from healthy African-American, Asian, Caucasian, Hispanic, and Ashkenazi Jewish individuals from the greater New York metropolitan area and 6,578 LIPA alleles from African-American, Caucasian, and Hispanic subjects enrolled in the Dallas Heart Study. The combined c.894G>A allele frequencies from the two cohorts ranged from 0.0005 (Asian) to 0.0017 (Caucasian and Hispanic), which translated to carrier frequencies of 1 in 1,000 to ∼1 in 300, respectively. No African-American heterozygotes were detected. Additionally, by surveying the available literature, c.894G>A was estimated to account for 60% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 51%-69%) of reported mutations among multiethnic CESD patients. Using this estimate, the predicted prevalence of CESD in the Caucasian and Hispanic populations is ∼0.8 per 100,000 (∼1 in 130,000; 95% CI: ∼1 in 90,000 to 1 in 170,000). Conclusion: These data indicate that CESD may be underdiagnosed in the general Caucasian and Hispanic populations, which is important since clinical trials of enzyme replacement therapy for LAL deficiency are currently being developed. Moreover, future studies on CESD prevalence in African and Asian populations may require full-gene LIPA sequencing to determine heterozygote frequencies, since c.894G>A is not common in these racial groups. (HEPATOLOGY 2013;53:958-965).

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