Functional and pharmacological significance of brain dopamine and norepinephrine storage pools

B. A. McMillen, D. C. German, P. A. Shore

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

92 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

It is interesting that two neuronal systems, which superficially seem anatomically and biochemically similar, are so different in their control mechanisms for regulating transmitter synthesis and release. The apparent principal difference is the dependence of the DA neurons on newly synthesized amine to maintain functional release while the large storage pool remains relatively inert. Thus, DA-containing neurons may regulate release per impulse indirectly by regulating rate of synthesis, while the NE-containing neurons regulate release per impulse directly through pre-synaptic receptors governing release of preformed transmitter. Secondarily, the rate of exchange between storage and releasable pools of DA could be an important point of regulation. DA uptake inhibitors seem to indirectly increase this rate of exchange, allowing much greater release of DA, possibly due to a decrease of free intracellular (newly taken up) DA, with this loss of free DA triggering a rapid rate of exchange between storage pool and releasable sites. Clearly, the intricacies of the DA storage system and local regulation of tyrosine hydroxylase activity represent an integral part of the mechanisms regulating DA release. On the other hand, such a complex role for storage function is not evident in central noradrenergic neurons, with other mechanisms (e.g. pre-synaptic receptor and impulse flow) regulating the rate of NE release.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3045-3050
Number of pages6
JournalBiochemical Pharmacology
Volume29
Issue number22
DOIs
StatePublished - 1980

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Neurons
Dopamine
Brain
Norepinephrine
Neurotransmitter Receptor
Pharmacology
Adrenergic Neurons
Transmitters
Tyrosine 3-Monooxygenase
Amines

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pharmacology

Cite this

Functional and pharmacological significance of brain dopamine and norepinephrine storage pools. / McMillen, B. A.; German, D. C.; Shore, P. A.

In: Biochemical Pharmacology, Vol. 29, No. 22, 1980, p. 3045-3050.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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