Functional domains required for tat-induced transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat.

J. A. Garcia, D. Harrich, L. Pearson, R. Mitsuyasu, R. B. Gaynor

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

125 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The transcriptional regulation of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) type I involves the interaction of both viral and cellular proteins. The viral protein tat is important in increasing the amount of viral steady-state mRNA and may also play a role in regulating the translational efficiency of viral mRNA. To identify distinct functional domains of tat, oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of the tat gene was performed. Point mutations of cysteine residues in three of the four Cys-X-X-Cys sequences in the tat protein resulted in a marked decrease in transcriptional activation of the HIV long terminal repeat. Point mutations which altered the basic C-domain of the protein also resulted in decreases in transcriptional activity, as did a series of mutations that repositioned either the N or C termini of the protein. Conservative mutations of other amino acids in the cysteine-rich or basic regions and in a series of proline residues in the N terminus of the molecule resulted in minimal changes in tat activation. These results suggest that several domains of tat protein are involved in transcriptional activation with the cysteine-rich domain being required for complete activity of the tat protein.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)3143-3147
Number of pages5
JournalEMBO Journal
Volume7
Issue number10
StatePublished - Oct 1988

Fingerprint

HIV Long Terminal Repeat
tat Gene Products
Terminal Repeat Sequences
Viruses
Transcriptional Activation
Cysteine
HIV-1
Chemical activation
Viral Proteins
Protein C
Point Mutation
tat Genes
Mutagenesis
Messenger RNA
Mutation
Proteins
Site-Directed Mutagenesis
Proline
Oligonucleotides
Genes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cell Biology
  • Genetics

Cite this

Garcia, J. A., Harrich, D., Pearson, L., Mitsuyasu, R., & Gaynor, R. B. (1988). Functional domains required for tat-induced transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. EMBO Journal, 7(10), 3143-3147.

Functional domains required for tat-induced transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. / Garcia, J. A.; Harrich, D.; Pearson, L.; Mitsuyasu, R.; Gaynor, R. B.

In: EMBO Journal, Vol. 7, No. 10, 10.1988, p. 3143-3147.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Garcia, JA, Harrich, D, Pearson, L, Mitsuyasu, R & Gaynor, RB 1988, 'Functional domains required for tat-induced transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat.', EMBO Journal, vol. 7, no. 10, pp. 3143-3147.
Garcia JA, Harrich D, Pearson L, Mitsuyasu R, Gaynor RB. Functional domains required for tat-induced transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. EMBO Journal. 1988 Oct;7(10):3143-3147.
Garcia, J. A. ; Harrich, D. ; Pearson, L. ; Mitsuyasu, R. ; Gaynor, R. B. / Functional domains required for tat-induced transcriptional activation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat. In: EMBO Journal. 1988 ; Vol. 7, No. 10. pp. 3143-3147.
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