Functional magnetic resonance imaging of auditory cortex in children

Seckin O. Ulualp, Bharat B. Biswal, F. Zerrin Yetkin, Thomas M. Kidder

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

29 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To obtain images of auditory cortex activation in children by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Methods: Seven healthy children (three girls and four boys), ages 6 to 10 years, were studied. Hearing evaluation was performed by pure-tone audiometry on the day of FMR study. Brain imaging was performed on a commercial 1.5 T imager using a three-axis local gradient coil. During scanning the children were instructed to lie still and avoid any lip, eye, jaw, or other facial movements. Subjects were asked to listen to a standard text presented in on-off sequences. Functional images of the auditory cortex were acquired with FMRI technique. Functional imaging processing was done using cross-correlation techniques with a coefficient of 0.5 (P < .0001). Results: Functional correlation images of the auditory cortex activation were obtained in six of seven children after image processing. All children showed activation in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, frontal lobe, and parietal regions. There was no significant difference in the number and percentage of activated pixels on right and left auditory cortices. Conclusions: Functional images of auditory cortex activation were obtained in healthy children following binaural text presentation. Consistent activation was observed in primary and secondary auditory cortices with no hemispheric dominance. FMRI characteristics of the auditory cortex activation in healthy children should be established in order to study those with hearing impairment.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1782-1786
Number of pages5
JournalLaryngoscope
Volume108
Issue number12
StatePublished - Dec 1998

Fingerprint

Auditory Cortex
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Pure-Tone Audiometry
Parietal Lobe
Temazepam
Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Lip
Jaw
Hearing Loss
Neuroimaging
Hearing

Keywords

  • Auditory cortex
  • Children
  • FMRI
  • Functional
  • Magnetic resonance

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Otorhinolaryngology

Cite this

Functional magnetic resonance imaging of auditory cortex in children. / Ulualp, Seckin O.; Biswal, Bharat B.; Yetkin, F. Zerrin; Kidder, Thomas M.

In: Laryngoscope, Vol. 108, No. 12, 12.1998, p. 1782-1786.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ulualp, SO, Biswal, BB, Yetkin, FZ & Kidder, TM 1998, 'Functional magnetic resonance imaging of auditory cortex in children', Laryngoscope, vol. 108, no. 12, pp. 1782-1786.
Ulualp, Seckin O. ; Biswal, Bharat B. ; Yetkin, F. Zerrin ; Kidder, Thomas M. / Functional magnetic resonance imaging of auditory cortex in children. In: Laryngoscope. 1998 ; Vol. 108, No. 12. pp. 1782-1786.
@article{6343d45517c146f7ad4b6ba823c37819,
title = "Functional magnetic resonance imaging of auditory cortex in children",
abstract = "Objective: To obtain images of auditory cortex activation in children by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Methods: Seven healthy children (three girls and four boys), ages 6 to 10 years, were studied. Hearing evaluation was performed by pure-tone audiometry on the day of FMR study. Brain imaging was performed on a commercial 1.5 T imager using a three-axis local gradient coil. During scanning the children were instructed to lie still and avoid any lip, eye, jaw, or other facial movements. Subjects were asked to listen to a standard text presented in on-off sequences. Functional images of the auditory cortex were acquired with FMRI technique. Functional imaging processing was done using cross-correlation techniques with a coefficient of 0.5 (P < .0001). Results: Functional correlation images of the auditory cortex activation were obtained in six of seven children after image processing. All children showed activation in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, frontal lobe, and parietal regions. There was no significant difference in the number and percentage of activated pixels on right and left auditory cortices. Conclusions: Functional images of auditory cortex activation were obtained in healthy children following binaural text presentation. Consistent activation was observed in primary and secondary auditory cortices with no hemispheric dominance. FMRI characteristics of the auditory cortex activation in healthy children should be established in order to study those with hearing impairment.",
keywords = "Auditory cortex, Children, FMRI, Functional, Magnetic resonance",
author = "Ulualp, {Seckin O.} and Biswal, {Bharat B.} and Yetkin, {F. Zerrin} and Kidder, {Thomas M.}",
year = "1998",
month = "12",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "108",
pages = "1782--1786",
journal = "Laryngoscope",
issn = "0023-852X",
publisher = "John Wiley and Sons Inc.",
number = "12",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional magnetic resonance imaging of auditory cortex in children

AU - Ulualp, Seckin O.

AU - Biswal, Bharat B.

AU - Yetkin, F. Zerrin

AU - Kidder, Thomas M.

PY - 1998/12

Y1 - 1998/12

N2 - Objective: To obtain images of auditory cortex activation in children by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Methods: Seven healthy children (three girls and four boys), ages 6 to 10 years, were studied. Hearing evaluation was performed by pure-tone audiometry on the day of FMR study. Brain imaging was performed on a commercial 1.5 T imager using a three-axis local gradient coil. During scanning the children were instructed to lie still and avoid any lip, eye, jaw, or other facial movements. Subjects were asked to listen to a standard text presented in on-off sequences. Functional images of the auditory cortex were acquired with FMRI technique. Functional imaging processing was done using cross-correlation techniques with a coefficient of 0.5 (P < .0001). Results: Functional correlation images of the auditory cortex activation were obtained in six of seven children after image processing. All children showed activation in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, frontal lobe, and parietal regions. There was no significant difference in the number and percentage of activated pixels on right and left auditory cortices. Conclusions: Functional images of auditory cortex activation were obtained in healthy children following binaural text presentation. Consistent activation was observed in primary and secondary auditory cortices with no hemispheric dominance. FMRI characteristics of the auditory cortex activation in healthy children should be established in order to study those with hearing impairment.

AB - Objective: To obtain images of auditory cortex activation in children by using functional magnetic resonance imaging (FMRI). Methods: Seven healthy children (three girls and four boys), ages 6 to 10 years, were studied. Hearing evaluation was performed by pure-tone audiometry on the day of FMR study. Brain imaging was performed on a commercial 1.5 T imager using a three-axis local gradient coil. During scanning the children were instructed to lie still and avoid any lip, eye, jaw, or other facial movements. Subjects were asked to listen to a standard text presented in on-off sequences. Functional images of the auditory cortex were acquired with FMRI technique. Functional imaging processing was done using cross-correlation techniques with a coefficient of 0.5 (P < .0001). Results: Functional correlation images of the auditory cortex activation were obtained in six of seven children after image processing. All children showed activation in the superior temporal gyrus, Heschl's gyrus, planum temporale, frontal lobe, and parietal regions. There was no significant difference in the number and percentage of activated pixels on right and left auditory cortices. Conclusions: Functional images of auditory cortex activation were obtained in healthy children following binaural text presentation. Consistent activation was observed in primary and secondary auditory cortices with no hemispheric dominance. FMRI characteristics of the auditory cortex activation in healthy children should be established in order to study those with hearing impairment.

KW - Auditory cortex

KW - Children

KW - FMRI

KW - Functional

KW - Magnetic resonance

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0031775307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0031775307&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

VL - 108

SP - 1782

EP - 1786

JO - Laryngoscope

JF - Laryngoscope

SN - 0023-852X

IS - 12

ER -