Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language.

Steven L. Small, Martha W. Burton

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Functional neuroimaging of language builds on almost 150 years of study in neurology, psychology, linguistics, anatomy, and physiology. In recent years, there has been an explosion of research using functional imaging technology, especially positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), to understand the relationship between brain mechanisms and language processing. These methods combine high-resolution anatomic images with measures of language-specific brain activity to reveal neural correlates of language processing. This article reviews some of what has been learned about the neuroanatomy of language from these imaging techniques. We first discuss the normal case, organizing the presentation according to the levels of language, encompassing words (lexicon), sound structure (phonemes), and sentences (syntax and semantics). Next, we delve into some unusual language processing circumstances, including second languages and sign languages. Finally, we discuss abnormal language processing, including developmental and acquired dyslexia and aphasia.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)505-510
Number of pages6
JournalCurrent neurology and neuroscience reports
Volume2
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2002
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Language
Magnetic Resonance Imaging
Acquired Dyslexia
Sign Language
Neuroanatomy
Functional Neuroimaging
Dyslexia
Explosions
Aphasia
Brain
Linguistics
Neurology
Semantics
Positron-Emission Tomography
Anatomy
Psychology
Technology
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of language. / Small, Steven L.; Burton, Martha W.

In: Current neurology and neuroscience reports, Vol. 2, No. 6, 11.2002, p. 505-510.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

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