Functional role of epitope spreading in the chronic pathogenesis of autoimmune and virus-induced demyelinating diseases

S. D. Miller, T. N. Eagar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

These results support a model of epitope spreading (Figure 4) wherein localized virus-specific T cell-mediated inflammatory processes lead to the recruitment/activation of CNS-resident APCs which can serve both as effector cells for myelin destruction and as APCs which efficiently process/present endogenous self epitopes to autoreactive T cells. Thus, inflammatory responses induced by viruses which trigger pro-inflammatory Th1 responses and have the ability to persist in genetically susceptible hosts, may lead to chronic organ-specific autoimmune disease via epitope spreading. Regardless of the specificity of the T cells (myelin peptides in R-EAE or TMEV epitopes in TMEV-IDD) responsible for initiating myelin destruction, epitope spreading plays an important contributory role in the chronic disease process in genetically susceptible SJL mice. Epitope spreading has obvious important implications to the design of antigen-specific therapies for the potential treatment of MS and other autoimmune diseases. This process indicates that autoimmune diseases are evolving pathologies and that the specificity of the effector autoantigen-specific T cells varies during the chronic disease process.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)99-107
Number of pages9
JournalAdvances in Experimental Medicine and Biology
Volume490
StatePublished - 2001

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Demyelinating Diseases
Viruses
Epitopes
T-cells
Myelin Sheath
Theilovirus
Autoimmune Diseases
T-Lymphocytes
Chronic Disease
T-Cell Antigen Receptor Specificity
Autoantigens
Pathology
Chemical activation
Antigens
Peptides

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)

Cite this

Functional role of epitope spreading in the chronic pathogenesis of autoimmune and virus-induced demyelinating diseases. / Miller, S. D.; Eagar, T. N.

In: Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, Vol. 490, 2001, p. 99-107.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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