GAP-43 augments G protein-coupled receptor transduction in Xenopus laevis oocytes

Stephen M. Strittmatter, Stephen C. Cannon, Elliott M. Ross, Tsutomu Higashijima, Mark C. Fishman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

62 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The neuronal protein GAP-43 is thought to play a role in determining growth-cone motility, perhaps as an intracellular regulator of signal transduction, but its molecular mechanism of action has remained unclear. We find that GAP-43, when microinjected into Xenopus laevis oocytes, increases the oocyte response to G protein-coupled receptor agonists by 10- to 100-fold. Higher levels of GAP-43 cause a transient current flow, even without receptor stimulation. The GAP-43-induced current, like receptor-stimulated currents, is mediated by a calcium-activated chloride channel and can be desensitized by injection of inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate. This suggests that neuronal GAP-43 may serve as an intracellular signal to greatly enhance the sensitivity of G protein-coupled receptor transduction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)5327-5331
Number of pages5
JournalProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Volume90
Issue number11
StatePublished - Jun 1 1993

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GAP-43 Protein
Xenopus laevis
G-Protein-Coupled Receptors
Oocytes
Growth Cones
Chloride Channels
Inositol 1,4,5-Trisphosphate
Signal Transduction
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General
  • Genetics

Cite this

GAP-43 augments G protein-coupled receptor transduction in Xenopus laevis oocytes. / Strittmatter, Stephen M.; Cannon, Stephen C.; Ross, Elliott M.; Higashijima, Tsutomu; Fishman, Mark C.

In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, Vol. 90, No. 11, 01.06.1993, p. 5327-5331.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Strittmatter, Stephen M. ; Cannon, Stephen C. ; Ross, Elliott M. ; Higashijima, Tsutomu ; Fishman, Mark C. / GAP-43 augments G protein-coupled receptor transduction in Xenopus laevis oocytes. In: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America. 1993 ; Vol. 90, No. 11. pp. 5327-5331.
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