Gastric and esophageal pH in patients with Barrett's esophagus treated with three esomeprazole dosages

A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial

Stuart J. Spechler, Prateek Sharma, Barry Traxler, Douglas Levine, Gary W. Falk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

46 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) are unusually resistant to the antisecretory effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). OBJECTIVES: To compare intragastric and intraesophageal acidity in patients with BE receiving esomeprazole 40 mg three times daily (t.i.d.), esomeprazole 40 mg twice daily (b.i.d.), and esomeprazole 20 mg t.i.d. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study, patients with long-segment BE received each of the three esomeprazole dosages for 5 days separated by 10-14-day washout periods. Intragastric and intraesophageal pHs were measured for 24 h on day 5. RESULTS: Among 31 patients with evaluable pH data, intragastric pH was >4.0 for 88.4%, 81.4%, and 80.4% of day 5 after treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. Esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d. was significantly more effective than the other dosages (p < 0.01). Intraesophageal pH was <4.0 for mean values of <5% of the monitoring period with all the three dosing regimens, but esophageal pH remained <4.0 for >5% of the time in 16%, 23%, and 19% of patients receiving esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. All dosages were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: All the three esomeprazole dosages significantly decreased intragastric acidity and reduced esophageal acid exposure to mean normal values in the total group of patients with BE. However, abnormal esophageal acid exposure continued in 16-23% of patients despite the significant decrease in gastric acidity. These results suggest that the apparent "PPI resistance" described in patients with BE may be caused by their profound reflux diathesis rather than by gastric resistance to the antisecretory effects of PPIs.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1964-1971
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Gastroenterology
Volume101
Issue number9
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 2006

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Esomeprazole
Barrett Esophagus
Cross-Over Studies
Stomach
Proton Pump Inhibitors
Acids
Disease Susceptibility
Reference Values

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Gastroenterology

Cite this

Gastric and esophageal pH in patients with Barrett's esophagus treated with three esomeprazole dosages : A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial. / Spechler, Stuart J.; Sharma, Prateek; Traxler, Barry; Levine, Douglas; Falk, Gary W.

In: American Journal of Gastroenterology, Vol. 101, No. 9, 09.2006, p. 1964-1971.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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title = "Gastric and esophageal pH in patients with Barrett's esophagus treated with three esomeprazole dosages: A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial",
abstract = "BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) are unusually resistant to the antisecretory effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). OBJECTIVES: To compare intragastric and intraesophageal acidity in patients with BE receiving esomeprazole 40 mg three times daily (t.i.d.), esomeprazole 40 mg twice daily (b.i.d.), and esomeprazole 20 mg t.i.d. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study, patients with long-segment BE received each of the three esomeprazole dosages for 5 days separated by 10-14-day washout periods. Intragastric and intraesophageal pHs were measured for 24 h on day 5. RESULTS: Among 31 patients with evaluable pH data, intragastric pH was >4.0 for 88.4{\%}, 81.4{\%}, and 80.4{\%} of day 5 after treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. Esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d. was significantly more effective than the other dosages (p < 0.01). Intraesophageal pH was <4.0 for mean values of <5{\%} of the monitoring period with all the three dosing regimens, but esophageal pH remained <4.0 for >5{\%} of the time in 16{\%}, 23{\%}, and 19{\%} of patients receiving esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. All dosages were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: All the three esomeprazole dosages significantly decreased intragastric acidity and reduced esophageal acid exposure to mean normal values in the total group of patients with BE. However, abnormal esophageal acid exposure continued in 16-23{\%} of patients despite the significant decrease in gastric acidity. These results suggest that the apparent {"}PPI resistance{"} described in patients with BE may be caused by their profound reflux diathesis rather than by gastric resistance to the antisecretory effects of PPIs.",
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T2 - A randomized, double-blind, crossover trial

AU - Spechler, Stuart J.

AU - Sharma, Prateek

AU - Traxler, Barry

AU - Levine, Douglas

AU - Falk, Gary W.

PY - 2006/9

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N2 - BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) are unusually resistant to the antisecretory effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). OBJECTIVES: To compare intragastric and intraesophageal acidity in patients with BE receiving esomeprazole 40 mg three times daily (t.i.d.), esomeprazole 40 mg twice daily (b.i.d.), and esomeprazole 20 mg t.i.d. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study, patients with long-segment BE received each of the three esomeprazole dosages for 5 days separated by 10-14-day washout periods. Intragastric and intraesophageal pHs were measured for 24 h on day 5. RESULTS: Among 31 patients with evaluable pH data, intragastric pH was >4.0 for 88.4%, 81.4%, and 80.4% of day 5 after treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. Esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d. was significantly more effective than the other dosages (p < 0.01). Intraesophageal pH was <4.0 for mean values of <5% of the monitoring period with all the three dosing regimens, but esophageal pH remained <4.0 for >5% of the time in 16%, 23%, and 19% of patients receiving esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. All dosages were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: All the three esomeprazole dosages significantly decreased intragastric acidity and reduced esophageal acid exposure to mean normal values in the total group of patients with BE. However, abnormal esophageal acid exposure continued in 16-23% of patients despite the significant decrease in gastric acidity. These results suggest that the apparent "PPI resistance" described in patients with BE may be caused by their profound reflux diathesis rather than by gastric resistance to the antisecretory effects of PPIs.

AB - BACKGROUND: It has been suggested that patients with Barrett's esophagus (BE) are unusually resistant to the antisecretory effects of proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). OBJECTIVES: To compare intragastric and intraesophageal acidity in patients with BE receiving esomeprazole 40 mg three times daily (t.i.d.), esomeprazole 40 mg twice daily (b.i.d.), and esomeprazole 20 mg t.i.d. METHODS: In this randomized, double-blind, three-way crossover study, patients with long-segment BE received each of the three esomeprazole dosages for 5 days separated by 10-14-day washout periods. Intragastric and intraesophageal pHs were measured for 24 h on day 5. RESULTS: Among 31 patients with evaluable pH data, intragastric pH was >4.0 for 88.4%, 81.4%, and 80.4% of day 5 after treatment with esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. Esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d. was significantly more effective than the other dosages (p < 0.01). Intraesophageal pH was <4.0 for mean values of <5% of the monitoring period with all the three dosing regimens, but esophageal pH remained <4.0 for >5% of the time in 16%, 23%, and 19% of patients receiving esomeprazole 40 mg t.i.d., 40 mg b.i.d., and 20 mg t.i.d., respectively. All dosages were well tolerated. CONCLUSIONS: All the three esomeprazole dosages significantly decreased intragastric acidity and reduced esophageal acid exposure to mean normal values in the total group of patients with BE. However, abnormal esophageal acid exposure continued in 16-23% of patients despite the significant decrease in gastric acidity. These results suggest that the apparent "PPI resistance" described in patients with BE may be caused by their profound reflux diathesis rather than by gastric resistance to the antisecretory effects of PPIs.

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