Gender-specific research on mental illness in the emergency department: Current knowledge and future directions

Megan L. Ranney, Natalie Locci, Erica J. Adams, Marian Betz, David B. Burmeister, Ted Corbin, Preeti Dalawari, Jeanne L. Jacoby, Judith Linden, Jonathan Purtle, Carol S North, Debra E. Houry

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Mental illness is a growing, and largely unaddressed, problem for the population and for emergency department (ED) patients in particular. Extensive literature outlines sex and gender differences in mental illness' epidemiology and risk and protective factors. Few studies, however, examined sex and gender differences in screening, diagnosis, and management of mental illness in the ED setting. Our consensus group used the nominal group technique to outline major gaps in knowledge and research priorities for these areas, including the influence of violence and other risk factors on the course of mental illness for ED patients. Our consensus group urges the pursuit of this research in general and conscious use of a gender lens when conducting, analyzing, and authoring future ED-based investigations of mental illness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1395-1402
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Emergency Medicine
Volume21
Issue number12
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

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Hospital Emergency Service
Research
Sex Characteristics
Violence
Lenses
Epidemiology
Direction compound
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Emergency Medicine

Cite this

Ranney, M. L., Locci, N., Adams, E. J., Betz, M., Burmeister, D. B., Corbin, T., ... Houry, D. E. (2014). Gender-specific research on mental illness in the emergency department: Current knowledge and future directions. Academic Emergency Medicine, 21(12), 1395-1402. https://doi.org/10.1111/acem.12524

Gender-specific research on mental illness in the emergency department : Current knowledge and future directions. / Ranney, Megan L.; Locci, Natalie; Adams, Erica J.; Betz, Marian; Burmeister, David B.; Corbin, Ted; Dalawari, Preeti; Jacoby, Jeanne L.; Linden, Judith; Purtle, Jonathan; North, Carol S; Houry, Debra E.

In: Academic Emergency Medicine, Vol. 21, No. 12, 01.12.2014, p. 1395-1402.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ranney, ML, Locci, N, Adams, EJ, Betz, M, Burmeister, DB, Corbin, T, Dalawari, P, Jacoby, JL, Linden, J, Purtle, J, North, CS & Houry, DE 2014, 'Gender-specific research on mental illness in the emergency department: Current knowledge and future directions', Academic Emergency Medicine, vol. 21, no. 12, pp. 1395-1402. https://doi.org/10.1111/acem.12524
Ranney, Megan L. ; Locci, Natalie ; Adams, Erica J. ; Betz, Marian ; Burmeister, David B. ; Corbin, Ted ; Dalawari, Preeti ; Jacoby, Jeanne L. ; Linden, Judith ; Purtle, Jonathan ; North, Carol S ; Houry, Debra E. / Gender-specific research on mental illness in the emergency department : Current knowledge and future directions. In: Academic Emergency Medicine. 2014 ; Vol. 21, No. 12. pp. 1395-1402.
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