Genome-wide allelotyping of lung cancer identifies new regions of allelic loss, differences between small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer, and loci clustering

L. Girard, S. Zochbauer-Muller, A. K. Virmani, A. F. Gazdar, J. D. Minna

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

303 Scopus citations

Abstract

To identify the major tumor suppressor gene (TSG) loci involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer, we have conducted a high-resolution (10 cM), genome-wide search of loss of heterozygosity (LOH). Thirty-six lung cancer cell lines [14 small cell lung cancers (SCLCs) and 22 non-SCLCs (NSCLCs)] and their matched control DNAs were analyzed using 399 fluorescent microsatellite markers from the ABI Prism linkage mapping set v.2 on an ABI 377 sequencer/genotyper. Overall, 22 different regions with more than 60% LOH were identified: (a) 13 regions with a preference for SCLC; (b) 7 regions with a preference for NSCLC; and (c) 2 regions affecting both SCLC and NSCLC. The chromosomal arms with the most frequent LOH were 1p, 3p, 4p, 4q, 5q, 8p, 9p (p16), 9q, 10p, 10q, 13q (Rb), 15q, 17p (p53), 18q, 19p, Xp, Xq. In addition, new homozygous deletions were found at 2p23, 8q24, 18q11, and Xq22. On average, 34% (SCLC) to 36% (NSCLC) of markers showed allele loss in individual tumors, with an average size of subchromosomal region of loss of five to six markers (50-60 cM). Whereas SCLC and NSCLC had different regions of frequent LOH (hot spots), and NSCLC had more of these regions (n = 22) than SCLC (n = 17), in all other parameters (fractional allelic loss, number of breakpoints, and number of microsatellite alterations), SCLC and NSCLC were not significantly different. Clustering analysis revealed correlations between LOH on different chromosomes that suggest previously unknown genetic interactions for lung cancer development. We conclude that (a) in lung cancer cell lines, at least 17-22 chromosomal regions with frequent allele loss are involved, suggesting that the same number of putative TSGs are inactivated; (b) SCLC and NSCLC frequently undergo different specific genetic alterations; and (c) clusters of TSGs are likely to be inactivated together. Overall, these data provide global estimates of the extent of genetic changes leading to lung cancer and will be useful for the positional cloning of new TSGs and for the identification of multiple new biomarkers for translational research.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)4894-4906
Number of pages13
JournalCancer Research
Volume60
Issue number17
StatePublished - Sep 1 2000

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Oncology
  • Cancer Research

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