Geriatric hip fracture management: keys to providing a successful program

N. Basu, M. Natour, V. Mounasamy, S. L. Kates

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

10 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hip fractures are a common event in older adults and are associated with significant morbidity, mortality and costs. This review examines the necessary elements required to implement a successful geriatric fracture program and identifies some of the barriers faced when implementing a successful program. Intervention: The Geriatric Fracture Center (GFC) is a treatment model that standardizes the approach to the geriatric fracture patient. It is based on five principles: surgical fracture management; early operative intervention; medical co-management with geriatricians; patient-centered, standard order sets to employ best practices; and early discharge planning with a focus on early functional rehabilitation. Implementing a geriatric fracture program begins with an assessment of the hospital’s data on hip fractures and standard care metrics such as length of stay, complications, time to surgery, readmission rates and costs. Business planning is essential along with the medical planning process. Conclusion: To successfully develop and implement such a program, strong physician leadership is necessary to articulate both a short- and long-term plan for implementation. Good communication is essential—those organizing a geriatric fracture program must be able to implement standardized plans of care working with all members of the healthcare team and must also be able to foster relationships both within the hospital and with other institutions in the community. Finally, a program of continual quality improvement must be undertaken to ensure that performance outcomes are improving patient care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)565-569
Number of pages5
JournalEuropean Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery
Volume42
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2016
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Hip Fractures
Geriatrics
Costs and Cost Analysis
Patient Care Team
Patient Discharge
Quality Improvement
Practice Guidelines
Length of Stay
Patient Care
Rehabilitation
Communication
Morbidity
Physicians
Mortality

Keywords

  • Geriatric
  • Hip fracture
  • Implementation
  • Management

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Emergency Medicine
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine
  • Critical Care and Intensive Care Medicine

Cite this

Geriatric hip fracture management : keys to providing a successful program. / Basu, N.; Natour, M.; Mounasamy, V.; Kates, S. L.

In: European Journal of Trauma and Emergency Surgery, Vol. 42, No. 5, 01.10.2016, p. 565-569.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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