Glial cells maintain synapses by inhibiting an activity-dependent retrograde protease signal

Thomas W. Gould, Bertha Dominguez, Fred de Winter, Gene W. Yeo, Patrick Liu, Balaji Sundararaman, Thomas Stark, Anthony Vu, Jay L. Degen, Weichun Lin, Kuo Fen Lee

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Glial cells regulate multiple aspects of synaptogenesis. In the absence of Schwann cells, a peripheral glial cell, motor neurons initially innervate muscle but then degenerate. Here, using a genetic approach, we show that neural activity-regulated negative factors produced by muscle drive neurodegeneration in Schwann cell-deficient mice. We find that thrombin, the hepatic serine protease central to the hemostatic coagulation cascade, is one such negative factor. Trancriptomic analysis shows that expression of the antithrombins serpin C1 and D1 is significantly reduced in Schwann cell-deficient mice. In the absence of peripheral neuromuscular activity, neurodegeneration is completely blocked, and expression of prothrombin in muscle is markedly reduced. In the absence of muscle-derived prothrombin, neurodegeneration is also markedly reduced. Together, these results suggest that Schwann cells regulate NMJs by opposing the effects of activity-regulated, muscle-derived negative factors and provide the first genetic evidence that thrombin plays a central role outside of the coagulation system.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)e1007948
JournalPLoS genetics
Volume15
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2019

Fingerprint

neuroglia
synapse
Schwann cells
Neuroglia
Synapses
Schwann Cells
muscle
Peptide Hydrolases
proteinases
Muscles
muscles
prothrombin
thrombin
Prothrombin
coagulation
Thrombin
Heparin Cofactor II
Antithrombins
Antithrombin III
mice

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Ecology, Evolution, Behavior and Systematics
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics
  • Genetics(clinical)
  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Gould, T. W., Dominguez, B., de Winter, F., Yeo, G. W., Liu, P., Sundararaman, B., ... Lee, K. F. (2019). Glial cells maintain synapses by inhibiting an activity-dependent retrograde protease signal. PLoS genetics, 15(3), e1007948. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1007948

Glial cells maintain synapses by inhibiting an activity-dependent retrograde protease signal. / Gould, Thomas W.; Dominguez, Bertha; de Winter, Fred; Yeo, Gene W.; Liu, Patrick; Sundararaman, Balaji; Stark, Thomas; Vu, Anthony; Degen, Jay L.; Lin, Weichun; Lee, Kuo Fen.

In: PLoS genetics, Vol. 15, No. 3, 01.03.2019, p. e1007948.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Gould, TW, Dominguez, B, de Winter, F, Yeo, GW, Liu, P, Sundararaman, B, Stark, T, Vu, A, Degen, JL, Lin, W & Lee, KF 2019, 'Glial cells maintain synapses by inhibiting an activity-dependent retrograde protease signal', PLoS genetics, vol. 15, no. 3, pp. e1007948. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1007948
Gould TW, Dominguez B, de Winter F, Yeo GW, Liu P, Sundararaman B et al. Glial cells maintain synapses by inhibiting an activity-dependent retrograde protease signal. PLoS genetics. 2019 Mar 1;15(3):e1007948. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pgen.1007948
Gould, Thomas W. ; Dominguez, Bertha ; de Winter, Fred ; Yeo, Gene W. ; Liu, Patrick ; Sundararaman, Balaji ; Stark, Thomas ; Vu, Anthony ; Degen, Jay L. ; Lin, Weichun ; Lee, Kuo Fen. / Glial cells maintain synapses by inhibiting an activity-dependent retrograde protease signal. In: PLoS genetics. 2019 ; Vol. 15, No. 3. pp. e1007948.
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