Glucose starvation induces a switch in the histone acetylome for activation of gluconeogenic and fat metabolism genes

Wen Chuan Hsieh, Benjamin M. Sutter, Holly Ruess, Spencer D. Barnes, Venkat Malladi, Benjamin P. Tu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

Acetyl-CoA is a key intermediate situated at the intersection of many metabolic pathways. The reliance of histone acetylation on acetyl-CoA enables the coordination of gene expression with metabolic state. Abundant acetyl-CoA has been linked to the activation of genes involved in cell growth or tumorigenesis through histone acetylation. However, the role of histone acetylation in transcription under low levels of acetyl-CoA remains poorly understood. Here, we use a yeast starvation model to observe the dramatic alteration in the global occupancy of histone acetylation following carbon starvation; the location of histone acetylation marks shifts from growth-promoting genes to gluconeogenic and fat metabolism genes. This reallocation is mediated by both the histone deacetylase Rpd3p and the acetyltransferase Gcn5p, a component of the SAGA transcriptional coactivator. Our findings reveal an unexpected switch in the specificity of histone acetylation to promote pathways that generate acetyl-CoA for oxidation when acetyl-CoA is limiting.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)60-74.e5
JournalMolecular cell
Volume82
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 6 2022

Keywords

  • acetyl-CoA
  • environmental stress response
  • fat metabolism
  • Gcn5p
  • gluconeogenesis
  • glucose starvation
  • histone acetylation
  • Rpd3p
  • SAGA
  • transcription

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Molecular Biology
  • Cell Biology

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