Glycosyl acceptors in intact and permeabilized normal and cystic fibrosis fibroblasts

Victoria L. Rudick, Michael J. Rudick, Patricia M. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Using cell permeabilization, a technique which allows addition of exogenously supplied radiolabeled sugar nucleotides to serve as direct glycosyl donors, oligosaccharide biosynthesis was examined in fibroblasts obtained from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects. Incubation of logarithmically growing cells with either radiolabeled leucine or xylose has indicated that there was a difference in the synthetic rate between the cell types. Protein synthesis in normal cells made permeable with 50 m̈g/ml lysolecithin (LL) was demonstrated to be absent, and could not be induced to take place by adding exogenous components, including energy sources and amino acids, normally required for protein synthesis. Thus radiolabeled sugars were being added to peptide acceptors which were already present at the time of LL addition. Both permeable and intact fibroblasts were exposed to labeled UDP‐xylose, UDP‐galactose, and UDP‐glucuronic acid, all donors of mucopolysaccharide precursors. The uptake of xylose into protein was the same for both normal and CF cells, but permeable CF fibroblasts incorporated statistically greater amounts of sugar from UDP‐galactose and UDP‐glucuronic acid. Intact CF cells were also labeled using these two sugar nucleotides. Trypan blue exclusion indicated CF and normal fibroblasts were equally intact. This and the fact that preincubation of CF cells with the appropriate cold sugar nucleotide eliminated the differences in incorporation between the normal and CF cells suggested that CF fibroblasts had more cell surface acceptor than the normal cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)143-150
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Cellular Physiology
Volume115
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1983

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ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)
  • Physiology
  • Clinical Biochemistry
  • Cell Biology

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