Growth hormone treatment enhances nutrition and growth in children with cystic fibrosis receiving enteral nutrition

Dana S. Hardin, Julie Rice, Chul Ahn, Thomas Ferkol, Michelle Howenstine, Stacey Spears, Claude Prestidge, Dan K. Seilheimer, Ross Shepherd

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

43 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objectives: Impaired longitudinal growth and poor weight gain are common and important problems in children with cystic fibrosis. This study evaluates the hypothesis that adjunctive growth hormone (GH) therapy augments the growth response to nutritional supplementation. Study design: We recruited 18 prepubertal children who received enteral nutritional supplementation for at least 2 years before enrollment. Nine were randomly assigned to receive no GH for 1 year, followed by 1 year of GH. Nine were randomly assigned to receive 1 year of GH followed by a second year of GH. Measurements included height, weight, pulmonary function, lean tissue mass, bone mineral content, hospitalizations, outpatient antibiotic use, and caloric intake. Results: Growth hormone resulted in significant improvement in height, weight, bone mineral content, lean tissue mass, and number of hospitalizations. Pulmonary function was similar at baseline. Absolute forced vital capacity and forced expiratory volume in 1 minute significantly increased in GH treatment, but there was no significant change in percent predicted pulmonary function. Caloric intake was similar in both groups during both years. Conclusions: These results suggest that GH is a useful for enhancing growth in children with cystic fibrosis receiving enteral nutritional supplementation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)324-328
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Pediatrics
Volume146
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2005

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Enteral Nutrition
Cystic Fibrosis
Growth Hormone
Growth
Therapeutics
Energy Intake
Bone Density
Lung
Small Intestine
Hospitalization
Weights and Measures
Vital Capacity
Forced Expiratory Volume
Weight Gain
Outpatients
Anti-Bacterial Agents

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Growth hormone treatment enhances nutrition and growth in children with cystic fibrosis receiving enteral nutrition. / Hardin, Dana S.; Rice, Julie; Ahn, Chul; Ferkol, Thomas; Howenstine, Michelle; Spears, Stacey; Prestidge, Claude; Seilheimer, Dan K.; Shepherd, Ross.

In: Journal of Pediatrics, Vol. 146, No. 3, 03.2005, p. 324-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Hardin, DS, Rice, J, Ahn, C, Ferkol, T, Howenstine, M, Spears, S, Prestidge, C, Seilheimer, DK & Shepherd, R 2005, 'Growth hormone treatment enhances nutrition and growth in children with cystic fibrosis receiving enteral nutrition', Journal of Pediatrics, vol. 146, no. 3, pp. 324-328. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jpeds.2004.10.037
Hardin, Dana S. ; Rice, Julie ; Ahn, Chul ; Ferkol, Thomas ; Howenstine, Michelle ; Spears, Stacey ; Prestidge, Claude ; Seilheimer, Dan K. ; Shepherd, Ross. / Growth hormone treatment enhances nutrition and growth in children with cystic fibrosis receiving enteral nutrition. In: Journal of Pediatrics. 2005 ; Vol. 146, No. 3. pp. 324-328.
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