Haemophilus ducreyi Hfq contributes to virulence gene regulation as cells enter stationary phase

Dharanesh Gangaiah, Maria Labandeira, Xinjun Zhang, Kate R. Fortney, Sheila Ellinger, Beth Zwickl, Beth Baker, Yunlong Liu, Diane M. Janowicz, Barry P. Katz, Chad A Brautigam, Robert S. Munson, Eric J Hansen, Stanley M. Spinola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

To adapt to stresses encountered in stationary phase, Gram-negative bacteria utilize the alternative sigma factor RpoS. However, some species lack RpoS; thus, it is unclear how stationary-phase adaptation is regulated in these organisms. Here we defined the growth-phase-dependent transcriptomes of Haemophilus ducreyi, which lacks an RpoS homolog. Compared to mid-log-phase organisms, cells harvested from the stationary phase upregulated genes encoding several virulence determinants and a homolog of hfq. Insertional inactivation of hfq altered the expression of ~16% of the H. ducreyi genes. Importantly, there were a significant overlap and an inverse correlation in the transcript levels of genes differentially expressed in the hfq inactivation mutant relative to its parent and the genes differentially expressed in stationary phase relative to mid-log phase in the parent. Inactivation of hfq downregulated genes in the flp-tad and lspB-lspA2 operons, which encode several virulence determinants. To comply with FDA guidelines for human inoculation experiments, an unmarked hfq deletion mutant was constructed and was fully attenuated for virulence in humans. Inactivation or deletion of hfq downregulated Flp1 and impaired the ability of H. ducreyi to form microcolonies, downregulated DsrA and rendered H. ducreyi serum susceptible, and downregulated LspB and LspA2, which allow H. ducreyi to resist phagocytosis. We propose that, in the absence of an RpoS homolog, Hfq serves as a major contributor of H. ducreyi stationary-phase and virulence gene regulation. The contribution of Hfq to stationary-phase gene regulation may have broad implications for other organisms that lack an RpoS homolog.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere01081-13
JournalmBio
Volume5
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 11 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Virology

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    Gangaiah, D., Labandeira, M., Zhang, X., Fortney, K. R., Ellinger, S., Zwickl, B., Baker, B., Liu, Y., Janowicz, D. M., Katz, B. P., Brautigam, C. A., Munson, R. S., Hansen, E. J., & Spinola, S. M. (2014). Haemophilus ducreyi Hfq contributes to virulence gene regulation as cells enter stationary phase. mBio, 5(1), [e01081-13]. https://doi.org/10.1128/mBio.01081-13