Halo-gravity traction

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Halo-gravity traction (HGT) is a safe and effective method to correct EOS deformity prior to operative management, or as a delaying tactic. It is well tolerated, providing instant patient mobilization in the upright position, and is especially useful in patients with thoracic insufficiency/respiratory impairment. Preoperative deformity correction (scoliosis and kyphosis) and thoracic height improvement is typically ~30 %, achieving valuable non-operative correction in patients where osteopenia and rigidity likely will prevent successful acute instrumented correction. Vital capacity is frequently improved 5–10 % due to improved diaphragmatic excursion, and weight gain occurs from elongation of the abdominal cavity. Contraindications to HGT include insufficient skull bone stock, intra- or extra-medullary space-occupying lesions in the spinal cord, and severe canal distortion with stenosis. Complications of traction include pin sepsis in 10–20 % of patients, usually managed with oral antibiotics, and neurologic injury in 1–1.5 %, which may not recover following HGT discontinuation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationThe Growing Spine: Management of Spinal Disorders in Young Children, Second Edition
PublisherSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
Pages537-551
Number of pages15
ISBN (Print)9783662482841, 9783662482834
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2015

Fingerprint

Gravitation
Traction
Thorax
Nervous System Trauma
Kyphosis
Abdominal Cavity
Metabolic Bone Diseases
Vital Capacity
Scoliosis
Skull
Respiratory Insufficiency
Weight Gain
Spinal Cord
Sepsis
Pathologic Constriction
Anti-Bacterial Agents
Bone and Bones

Keywords

  • Early onset spine deformity
  • Halo-gravity traction
  • Preoperative correction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Johnston, C. E. (2015). Halo-gravity traction. In The Growing Spine: Management of Spinal Disorders in Young Children, Second Edition (pp. 537-551). Springer Berlin Heidelberg. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-48284-1_30

Halo-gravity traction. / Johnston, Charles E.

The Growing Spine: Management of Spinal Disorders in Young Children, Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. p. 537-551.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Johnston, CE 2015, Halo-gravity traction. in The Growing Spine: Management of Spinal Disorders in Young Children, Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, pp. 537-551. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-48284-1_30
Johnston CE. Halo-gravity traction. In The Growing Spine: Management of Spinal Disorders in Young Children, Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg. 2015. p. 537-551 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-662-48284-1_30
Johnston, Charles E. / Halo-gravity traction. The Growing Spine: Management of Spinal Disorders in Young Children, Second Edition. Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2015. pp. 537-551
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