Health behavior and behavioral economics

Economic preferences and physical activity stages of change in a low-income African-American Community

Tammy Leonard, Kerem Shuval, Angela De Oliveira, Celette Sugg Skinner, Catherine Eckel, James C. Murdoch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Purpose. To examine the relationship between physical activity stages of change and preferences for financial risk and time. Design. A cross-sectional, community-based study. Setting. A low-income, urban, African-American neighborhood. Subjects. One hundred sixty-nine adults. Measures. Self-reported physical activity stages of change-precontemplation to maintenance, objectively measured body mass index and waist circumference, and economic preferences for time and risk measured via incentivized economic experiments. Analysis. Multivariable ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between physical activity stages of change and economic preferences while controlling for demographic characteristics of the individuals. Results. Individuals who are more tolerant of financial risks (odds ratio [OR] = 1.31, p < .05) and whose time preferences indicate more patience (OR = 1.68, p < .01) are more likely to be in a more advanced physical activity stage (e.g., from preparation to action). The likelihood of being in the maintenance stage increases by 5.6 and 10.9 percentage points for each one-unit increase in financial risk tolerance or one-unit increase in the time preference measure, respectively. Conclusion. Greater tolerance of financial risk and more patient time preferences among this low-income ethnic minority population are associated with a more advanced physical activity stage. Further exploration is clearly warranted in larger and more representative samples.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)211-221
Number of pages11
JournalAmerican Journal of Health Promotion
Volume27
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2013

Fingerprint

Behavioral Economics
Health Behavior
health behavior
African Americans
low income
Economics
Exercise
community
Odds Ratio
economics
Logistic Models
tolerance
Maintenance
Patient Preference
Waist Circumference
Body Mass Index
national minority
Demography
American
logistics

Keywords

  • Behavioral economics
  • Physical activity
  • Prevention research
  • Risk preferences
  • Stages of change
  • Time preferences

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Health(social science)
  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Health behavior and behavioral economics : Economic preferences and physical activity stages of change in a low-income African-American Community. / Leonard, Tammy; Shuval, Kerem; De Oliveira, Angela; Skinner, Celette Sugg; Eckel, Catherine; Murdoch, James C.

In: American Journal of Health Promotion, Vol. 27, No. 4, 03.2013, p. 211-221.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Leonard, Tammy ; Shuval, Kerem ; De Oliveira, Angela ; Skinner, Celette Sugg ; Eckel, Catherine ; Murdoch, James C. / Health behavior and behavioral economics : Economic preferences and physical activity stages of change in a low-income African-American Community. In: American Journal of Health Promotion. 2013 ; Vol. 27, No. 4. pp. 211-221.
@article{b347e29efd3645c3b1d8740b2c213acd,
title = "Health behavior and behavioral economics: Economic preferences and physical activity stages of change in a low-income African-American Community",
abstract = "Purpose. To examine the relationship between physical activity stages of change and preferences for financial risk and time. Design. A cross-sectional, community-based study. Setting. A low-income, urban, African-American neighborhood. Subjects. One hundred sixty-nine adults. Measures. Self-reported physical activity stages of change-precontemplation to maintenance, objectively measured body mass index and waist circumference, and economic preferences for time and risk measured via incentivized economic experiments. Analysis. Multivariable ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between physical activity stages of change and economic preferences while controlling for demographic characteristics of the individuals. Results. Individuals who are more tolerant of financial risks (odds ratio [OR] = 1.31, p < .05) and whose time preferences indicate more patience (OR = 1.68, p < .01) are more likely to be in a more advanced physical activity stage (e.g., from preparation to action). The likelihood of being in the maintenance stage increases by 5.6 and 10.9 percentage points for each one-unit increase in financial risk tolerance or one-unit increase in the time preference measure, respectively. Conclusion. Greater tolerance of financial risk and more patient time preferences among this low-income ethnic minority population are associated with a more advanced physical activity stage. Further exploration is clearly warranted in larger and more representative samples.",
keywords = "Behavioral economics, Physical activity, Prevention research, Risk preferences, Stages of change, Time preferences",
author = "Tammy Leonard and Kerem Shuval and {De Oliveira}, Angela and Skinner, {Celette Sugg} and Catherine Eckel and Murdoch, {James C.}",
year = "2013",
month = "3",
doi = "10.4278/ajhp.110624-QUAN-264",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "27",
pages = "211--221",
journal = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
issn = "0890-1171",
publisher = "American Journal of Health Promotion",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Health behavior and behavioral economics

T2 - Economic preferences and physical activity stages of change in a low-income African-American Community

AU - Leonard, Tammy

AU - Shuval, Kerem

AU - De Oliveira, Angela

AU - Skinner, Celette Sugg

AU - Eckel, Catherine

AU - Murdoch, James C.

PY - 2013/3

Y1 - 2013/3

N2 - Purpose. To examine the relationship between physical activity stages of change and preferences for financial risk and time. Design. A cross-sectional, community-based study. Setting. A low-income, urban, African-American neighborhood. Subjects. One hundred sixty-nine adults. Measures. Self-reported physical activity stages of change-precontemplation to maintenance, objectively measured body mass index and waist circumference, and economic preferences for time and risk measured via incentivized economic experiments. Analysis. Multivariable ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between physical activity stages of change and economic preferences while controlling for demographic characteristics of the individuals. Results. Individuals who are more tolerant of financial risks (odds ratio [OR] = 1.31, p < .05) and whose time preferences indicate more patience (OR = 1.68, p < .01) are more likely to be in a more advanced physical activity stage (e.g., from preparation to action). The likelihood of being in the maintenance stage increases by 5.6 and 10.9 percentage points for each one-unit increase in financial risk tolerance or one-unit increase in the time preference measure, respectively. Conclusion. Greater tolerance of financial risk and more patient time preferences among this low-income ethnic minority population are associated with a more advanced physical activity stage. Further exploration is clearly warranted in larger and more representative samples.

AB - Purpose. To examine the relationship between physical activity stages of change and preferences for financial risk and time. Design. A cross-sectional, community-based study. Setting. A low-income, urban, African-American neighborhood. Subjects. One hundred sixty-nine adults. Measures. Self-reported physical activity stages of change-precontemplation to maintenance, objectively measured body mass index and waist circumference, and economic preferences for time and risk measured via incentivized economic experiments. Analysis. Multivariable ordered logistic regression models were used to examine the association between physical activity stages of change and economic preferences while controlling for demographic characteristics of the individuals. Results. Individuals who are more tolerant of financial risks (odds ratio [OR] = 1.31, p < .05) and whose time preferences indicate more patience (OR = 1.68, p < .01) are more likely to be in a more advanced physical activity stage (e.g., from preparation to action). The likelihood of being in the maintenance stage increases by 5.6 and 10.9 percentage points for each one-unit increase in financial risk tolerance or one-unit increase in the time preference measure, respectively. Conclusion. Greater tolerance of financial risk and more patient time preferences among this low-income ethnic minority population are associated with a more advanced physical activity stage. Further exploration is clearly warranted in larger and more representative samples.

KW - Behavioral economics

KW - Physical activity

KW - Prevention research

KW - Risk preferences

KW - Stages of change

KW - Time preferences

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84882323131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84882323131&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.4278/ajhp.110624-QUAN-264

DO - 10.4278/ajhp.110624-QUAN-264

M3 - Article

VL - 27

SP - 211

EP - 221

JO - American Journal of Health Promotion

JF - American Journal of Health Promotion

SN - 0890-1171

IS - 4

ER -