Health care professionals' skills, beliefs, and expectations about screening for domestic violence in a border community

Heather Woodworth Goff, Theresa L. Byrd, Andrea J. Shelton, Guy S. Parcel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Scopus citations

Abstract

This article describes domestic violence education of health professionals and determines association between screening behavior and preparedness, outcome expectations, and beliefs about how and when to screen. A survey was mailed to all primary care physicians, dentists, and nurse practitioners in El Paso, Texas (n = 561). Return rate was 34.4%. Using linear regression, differences (p < 0.05) were found between dentists and others in percentage of patients screened, education, preparedness, and beliefs. Education had a positive association (p < 0.001) with preparedness, beliefs about when to screen, and outcome expectations, and a negative association with beliefs about how to screen. Preparedness, beliefs, and realistic outcome expectations had a positive association (p < 0.02) with percentage of female patients screened. Education about domestic violence is important in increasing preparedness and influencing beliefs about when to screen and what outcomes can be expected. Educational programs should include not only information, but also skills training to increase perceptions of preparedness.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)39-54
Number of pages16
JournalFamily and Community Health
Volume24
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2001
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • Domestic violence
  • Professional education
  • U.S.-Mexico border
  • Women's health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

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