Health status, emotional/behavioral problems, health care use, and expenditures in overweight/obese US children/adolescents

Christy Boling Turer, Hua Lin, Glenn Flores

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To examine the association of overweight/obesity with health, health care utilization, and expenditures in a national sample of 10- to 17-year-old children and adolescents. Methods: Secondary analysis of 2005 to 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data (n = 17,224). Outcome measures included suboptimal health, emotional/behavioral problems, health care utilization, and expenditures. Results: Overweight and obese children and adolescents had greater risk of suboptimal health (adjusted risk ratio [ARR], 1.4 and 1.7; P <.01), use of prescriptions (ARR, both 1.1; P =.01), and emergency department visits (ARR, 1.2 and 1.1; P =.01); overweight children/adolescents had lower mean out-of-pocket expenditures (∼$100, P <.01); and obese children/adolescents had greater risk of emotional/behavioral problems (ARR, 1.2; P <.01) and specialist visits (ARR, 1.1; P =.01). The most common specialty referral among obese children/adolescents was psychiatry. Overweight and obesity were not associated with office visits or total expenditures. A greater proportions of children and adolescents with suboptimal health and emotional/behavioral problems had health care expenditures, and those with suboptimal health were more likely to have out-of-pocket expenditures. Conclusions: Pediatric overweight and obesity affect child and adolescent health status, emotional/behavioral problems, and specific domains of health care utilization, but do not appear to be associated with total health care expenditures. Out-of-pocket expenditures are lower among overweight children and adolescents. These findings highlight the need for early intervention in overweight children/adolescents, when health care expenditures may not be greater, and suggest that it may prove useful to pay special attention to the health status and emotional/behavioral problems of overweight and obese children/adolescents in weight-management interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)251-258
Number of pages8
JournalAcademic Pediatrics
Volume13
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2013

Fingerprint

Health Expenditures
Health Status
Delivery of Health Care
Patient Acceptance of Health Care
Odds Ratio
Health
Obesity
Problem Behavior
Adolescent Psychiatry
Office Visits
Pediatric Obesity
Prescriptions
Hospital Emergency Service
Referral and Consultation
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)
Weights and Measures

Keywords

  • child health
  • child health services/economics
  • health services research
  • obesity
  • overweight

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

Health status, emotional/behavioral problems, health care use, and expenditures in overweight/obese US children/adolescents. / Turer, Christy Boling; Lin, Hua; Flores, Glenn.

In: Academic Pediatrics, Vol. 13, No. 3, 05.2013, p. 251-258.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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abstract = "Objective: To examine the association of overweight/obesity with health, health care utilization, and expenditures in a national sample of 10- to 17-year-old children and adolescents. Methods: Secondary analysis of 2005 to 2009 Medical Expenditure Panel Survey data (n = 17,224). Outcome measures included suboptimal health, emotional/behavioral problems, health care utilization, and expenditures. Results: Overweight and obese children and adolescents had greater risk of suboptimal health (adjusted risk ratio [ARR], 1.4 and 1.7; P <.01), use of prescriptions (ARR, both 1.1; P =.01), and emergency department visits (ARR, 1.2 and 1.1; P =.01); overweight children/adolescents had lower mean out-of-pocket expenditures (∼$100, P <.01); and obese children/adolescents had greater risk of emotional/behavioral problems (ARR, 1.2; P <.01) and specialist visits (ARR, 1.1; P =.01). The most common specialty referral among obese children/adolescents was psychiatry. Overweight and obesity were not associated with office visits or total expenditures. A greater proportions of children and adolescents with suboptimal health and emotional/behavioral problems had health care expenditures, and those with suboptimal health were more likely to have out-of-pocket expenditures. Conclusions: Pediatric overweight and obesity affect child and adolescent health status, emotional/behavioral problems, and specific domains of health care utilization, but do not appear to be associated with total health care expenditures. Out-of-pocket expenditures are lower among overweight children and adolescents. These findings highlight the need for early intervention in overweight children/adolescents, when health care expenditures may not be greater, and suggest that it may prove useful to pay special attention to the health status and emotional/behavioral problems of overweight and obese children/adolescents in weight-management interventions.",
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