Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is blunted in hypertensive seniors

Stuart A. Best, Tiffany B. Bivens, M. Dean Palmer, Kara N. Boyd, M. Melyn Galbreath, Yoshiyuki Okada, Graeme Carrick-Ranson, Naoki Fujimoto, Shigeki Shibata, Jeffrey L Hastings, Matthew D. Spencer, Takashi Tarumi Ph.D., Benjamin D Levine, Qi Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Abnormal heart rate recovery (HRR) after maximal exercise may indicate autonomic dysfunction and is a predictor for cardiovascular mortality. HRR is attenuated with aging and in middle-age hypertensive patients, but it is unknown whether HRR is attenuated in older-age adults with hypertension. This study compared HRR among 16 unmedicated stage 1 hypertensive (HTN) participants [nine men/seven women; 68 ± 5 (SD) yr; awake ambulatory blood pressure (BP) 149 ± 10/87 ± 7 mmHg] and 16 normotensive [control (CON)] participants (nine men/seven women; 67 ± 5 yr; 122 ± 4/72 ± 5 mmHg). HR, BP, oxygen uptake (V? O2), cardiac output (Qc), and stroke volume (SV) were measured at rest, at two steady-state work rates, and graded exercise to peak during maximal treadmill exercise. During 6 min of seated recovery, the change in HR (ΔHR) was obtained every minute and BP every 2 min. In addition, HRR and R-R interval (RRI) recovery kinetics were analyzed using a monoexponential function, and the indexes (HRRI and RRII) were calculated. Maximum V ? O2, HR, Qc, and SV responses during exercise were not different between groups. ΔHR was significantly different (P < 0.001) between the HTN group (26 ± 8) and the CON group (36 ± 12 beats/min) after 1 min of recovery but less convincing at 2 min (P = 0.055). BP recovery was similar between groups. HRRI was significantly lower (P = 0.016), and there was a trend of lower RRII (P = 0.066) in the HTN group compared with the CON group. These results show that in older-age adults, HRR is attenuated further with the presence of hypertension, which may be attributable to an impairment of autonomic function.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1302-1307
Number of pages6
JournalJournal of Applied Physiology
Volume117
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1 2014

Fingerprint

Heart Rate
Exercise
Blood Pressure
Stroke Volume
Hypertension
Control Groups
Cardiac Output
Oxygen
Mortality

Keywords

  • Autonomic function
  • Exercise
  • Heart rate recovery
  • Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Physiology (medical)

Cite this

Best, S. A., Bivens, T. B., Palmer, M. D., Boyd, K. N., Galbreath, M. M., Okada, Y., ... Fu, Q. (2014). Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is blunted in hypertensive seniors. Journal of Applied Physiology, 117(11), 1302-1307. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00395.2014

Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is blunted in hypertensive seniors. / Best, Stuart A.; Bivens, Tiffany B.; Palmer, M. Dean; Boyd, Kara N.; Galbreath, M. Melyn; Okada, Yoshiyuki; Carrick-Ranson, Graeme; Fujimoto, Naoki; Shibata, Shigeki; Hastings, Jeffrey L; Spencer, Matthew D.; Tarumi Ph.D., Takashi; Levine, Benjamin D; Fu, Qi.

In: Journal of Applied Physiology, Vol. 117, No. 11, 01.12.2014, p. 1302-1307.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Best, SA, Bivens, TB, Palmer, MD, Boyd, KN, Galbreath, MM, Okada, Y, Carrick-Ranson, G, Fujimoto, N, Shibata, S, Hastings, JL, Spencer, MD, Tarumi Ph.D., T, Levine, BD & Fu, Q 2014, 'Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is blunted in hypertensive seniors', Journal of Applied Physiology, vol. 117, no. 11, pp. 1302-1307. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00395.2014
Best SA, Bivens TB, Palmer MD, Boyd KN, Galbreath MM, Okada Y et al. Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is blunted in hypertensive seniors. Journal of Applied Physiology. 2014 Dec 1;117(11):1302-1307. https://doi.org/10.1152/japplphysiol.00395.2014
Best, Stuart A. ; Bivens, Tiffany B. ; Palmer, M. Dean ; Boyd, Kara N. ; Galbreath, M. Melyn ; Okada, Yoshiyuki ; Carrick-Ranson, Graeme ; Fujimoto, Naoki ; Shibata, Shigeki ; Hastings, Jeffrey L ; Spencer, Matthew D. ; Tarumi Ph.D., Takashi ; Levine, Benjamin D ; Fu, Qi. / Heart rate recovery after maximal exercise is blunted in hypertensive seniors. In: Journal of Applied Physiology. 2014 ; Vol. 117, No. 11. pp. 1302-1307.
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