Heat loss prevention in the delivery room for preterm infants: A national survey of Newborn Intensive Care Units

Robin B. Knobel, Sunita Vohra, Christoph U. Lehmann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

31 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Hypothermia incurred during delivery room resuscitation continues to cause morbidity in infants <29 weeks gestation. Three recent trials have shown that wrapping such infants instead of drying prevents heat loss, resulting in higher infant temperatures at Newborn Intensive Care Unit (NICU) admission. Objective: To describe current NICU practices with respect to wrapping preterm infants to prevent heat loss in the delivery room. Study design: E-mail survey of neonatologists from national registry using a web-based survey tool. Results: Of 411 e-mails successfully delivered, 125 (30%) responded. Most (87%) represented level III NICUs. Almost one-fifth of respondents (20%) use occlusive material instead of drying preterms in the delivery room. Considerable variation exists regarding choice of wrap and duration of use. Few adverse events were reported. Conclusion: "In all" was added - This implies 20% of all NICU's changed practice, 20% of level III NICUs responding have changed delivery room resuscitation practices rapidly in response to new evidence. No "gold" standard exists nationally and there is considerable variation in practice. Neonatal resuscitation guidelines for premature infants should include recommendations regarding choice occlusive wrap and application techniques.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)514-518
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Perinatology
Volume25
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2005
Externally publishedYes

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Delivery Rooms
Neonatal Intensive Care Units
Premature Infants
Hot Temperature
Resuscitation
Postal Service
Hypothermia
Gold
Registries
Guidelines
Morbidity
Pregnancy
Temperature
Surveys and Questionnaires

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Obstetrics and Gynecology

Cite this

Heat loss prevention in the delivery room for preterm infants : A national survey of Newborn Intensive Care Units. / Knobel, Robin B.; Vohra, Sunita; Lehmann, Christoph U.

In: Journal of Perinatology, Vol. 25, No. 8, 01.08.2005, p. 514-518.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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