Hemodynamic, pulmonary vascular, and myocardial abnormalities secondary to pharmacologic constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus. A possible mechanism for persistent pulmonary hypertension and transient tricuspid insufficiency in the newborn infant

D. L. Levin, L. J. Mills, A. G. Weinberg

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

108 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor indomethacin was given orally or intravenously to pregnant ewes. This resulted in a significant rise in the fetal pulmonary-to-systemic arterial mean blood pressure difference across the ductus arteriosus, presumably secondary to constriction of the ductus arteriosus. In five experiments the pressure difference could be promptly but temporarily reversed by the administration of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) into the fetal inferior vena cava. Fetal lungs from study and control animals were fixed by perfusion at measured pulmonary arterial mean blood pressure, and fifth-generation resistance vessels were studied. The medial width/external diameter ratio was significantly increased in the study vs the control lungs due to increased smooth muscle and decreased external diameter. In addition, study fetuses had acute degenerative myocardial changes in the tricuspid valve papillary muscles, the right ventricular free wall and the interventricular septum. Similar changes were not seen in control fetuses. Indomethacin administration during pregnancy causes constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus, fetal pulmonary arterial hypertension, and right ventricular damage. If severe, this may cause rapid fetal death. If less severe, in the newborn infant, this mechanism may be one cause of persistent pulmonary hypertension due to vasoconstriction and increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and/or tricuspid insufficiency due to papillary muscle infarction.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)360-364
Number of pages5
JournalCirculation
Volume60
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1979

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Ductus Arteriosus
Pulmonary Hypertension
Constriction
Blood Vessels
Hemodynamics
Newborn Infant
Lung
Papillary Muscles
Indomethacin
Smooth Muscle
Arterial Pressure
Fetus
Prostaglandin Antagonists
Fetal Death
Tricuspid Valve
Alprostadil
Inferior Vena Cava
Prostaglandin-Endoperoxide Synthases
Vasoconstriction
Infarction

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

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abstract = "The prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor indomethacin was given orally or intravenously to pregnant ewes. This resulted in a significant rise in the fetal pulmonary-to-systemic arterial mean blood pressure difference across the ductus arteriosus, presumably secondary to constriction of the ductus arteriosus. In five experiments the pressure difference could be promptly but temporarily reversed by the administration of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) into the fetal inferior vena cava. Fetal lungs from study and control animals were fixed by perfusion at measured pulmonary arterial mean blood pressure, and fifth-generation resistance vessels were studied. The medial width/external diameter ratio was significantly increased in the study vs the control lungs due to increased smooth muscle and decreased external diameter. In addition, study fetuses had acute degenerative myocardial changes in the tricuspid valve papillary muscles, the right ventricular free wall and the interventricular septum. Similar changes were not seen in control fetuses. Indomethacin administration during pregnancy causes constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus, fetal pulmonary arterial hypertension, and right ventricular damage. If severe, this may cause rapid fetal death. If less severe, in the newborn infant, this mechanism may be one cause of persistent pulmonary hypertension due to vasoconstriction and increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and/or tricuspid insufficiency due to papillary muscle infarction.",
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AU - Weinberg, A. G.

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N2 - The prostaglandin synthetase inhibitor indomethacin was given orally or intravenously to pregnant ewes. This resulted in a significant rise in the fetal pulmonary-to-systemic arterial mean blood pressure difference across the ductus arteriosus, presumably secondary to constriction of the ductus arteriosus. In five experiments the pressure difference could be promptly but temporarily reversed by the administration of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1) into the fetal inferior vena cava. Fetal lungs from study and control animals were fixed by perfusion at measured pulmonary arterial mean blood pressure, and fifth-generation resistance vessels were studied. The medial width/external diameter ratio was significantly increased in the study vs the control lungs due to increased smooth muscle and decreased external diameter. In addition, study fetuses had acute degenerative myocardial changes in the tricuspid valve papillary muscles, the right ventricular free wall and the interventricular septum. Similar changes were not seen in control fetuses. Indomethacin administration during pregnancy causes constriction of the fetal ductus arteriosus, fetal pulmonary arterial hypertension, and right ventricular damage. If severe, this may cause rapid fetal death. If less severe, in the newborn infant, this mechanism may be one cause of persistent pulmonary hypertension due to vasoconstriction and increased pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and/or tricuspid insufficiency due to papillary muscle infarction.

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