Hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of new generation antivirals

Thomas F. Baumert, Frank Jühling, Atsushi Ono, Yujin Hoshida

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

56 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hepatitis C virus infection is a major cause of hepatocellular carcinoma worldwide. Interferon has been the major antiviral treatment, yielding viral clearance in approximately half of patients. New direct-acting antivirals substantially improved the cure rate to above 90%. However, access to therapies remains limited due to the high costs and under-diagnosis of infection in specific subpopulations, e.g., baby boomers, inmates, and injection drug users, and therefore, hepatocellular carcinoma incidence is predicted to increase in the next decades even in high-resource countries. Moreover, cancer risk persists even after 10 years of viral cure, and thus a clinical strategy for its monitoring is urgently needed. Several risk-predictive host factors, e.g., advanced liver fibrosis, older age, accompanying metabolic diseases such as diabetes, persisting hepatic inflammation, and elevated alpha-fetoprotein, as well as viral factors, e.g., core protein variants and genotype 3, have been reported. Indeed, a molecular signature in the liver has been associated with cancer risk even after viral cure. Direct-acting antivirals may affect cancer development and recurrence, which needs to be determined in further investigation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number52
JournalBMC Medicine
Volume15
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 14 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Hepatitis C
Antiviral Agents
Hepatocellular Carcinoma
Neoplasms
Liver
Metabolic Diseases
alpha-Fetoproteins
Virus Diseases
Drug Users
Hepacivirus
Liver Cirrhosis
Interferons
Genotype
Inflammation
Costs and Cost Analysis
Recurrence
Injections
Incidence
Therapeutics
Infection

Keywords

  • Direct-acting antivirals
  • Hepatitis C virus
  • Hepatocellular carcinoma
  • Interferon
  • Sustained virologic response

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of new generation antivirals. / Baumert, Thomas F.; Jühling, Frank; Ono, Atsushi; Hoshida, Yujin.

In: BMC Medicine, Vol. 15, No. 1, 52, 14.03.2017.

Research output: Contribution to journalShort survey

Baumert, Thomas F. ; Jühling, Frank ; Ono, Atsushi ; Hoshida, Yujin. / Hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma in the era of new generation antivirals. In: BMC Medicine. 2017 ; Vol. 15, No. 1.
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