Heterogeneity in spasmodic dysphonia. Neurologic and voice findings

K. D. Pool, F. J. Freeman, T. Finitzo, M. M. Hayashi, S. B. Chapman, M. D. Devous, L. G. Close, G. V. Kondraske, D. Mendelsohn, S. D. Schaefer, B. C. Watson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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Abstract

Spasmodic dysphonia is a disturbance of phonation with laryngeal spasms. We report voice and neurologic examination findings in 45 subjects. Neurologic abnormalities were found in 32 subjects (71.1%). Rapid alternating movement abnormalities, weakness, and tremor were common. Incoordination and spasticity were rare. Lower extremity findings were frequent. Abnormalities were bilateral. Spasmodic dysphonia severity was related to age. Type, severity, and duration of vocal symptoms were not different for subjects with or without neurologic abnormalities. Vocal tremor was more frequent in neurologically abnormal subjects. Involvement of a pallidothalamic-supplementary motor area system could account for neurologic findings, brain imaging findings, and clinical heterogeneity. The view emerging is that spasmodic dysphonia is a manifestation of disordered motor control involving systems of neurons rather than single anatomical sites.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)305-309
Number of pages5
JournalArchives of Neurology
Volume48
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1991

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Dysphonia
Neurologic Manifestations
Nervous System Malformations
Tremor
Laryngismus
Phonation
Neurologic Examination
Motor Cortex
Ataxia
Neuroimaging
Lower Extremity
Neurons
Motor Control
Laryngeal
Manifestation
Brain Imaging
Neuron

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Pool, K. D., Freeman, F. J., Finitzo, T., Hayashi, M. M., Chapman, S. B., Devous, M. D., ... Watson, B. C. (1991). Heterogeneity in spasmodic dysphonia. Neurologic and voice findings. Archives of Neurology, 48(3), 305-309.

Heterogeneity in spasmodic dysphonia. Neurologic and voice findings. / Pool, K. D.; Freeman, F. J.; Finitzo, T.; Hayashi, M. M.; Chapman, S. B.; Devous, M. D.; Close, L. G.; Kondraske, G. V.; Mendelsohn, D.; Schaefer, S. D.; Watson, B. C.

In: Archives of Neurology, Vol. 48, No. 3, 1991, p. 305-309.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pool, KD, Freeman, FJ, Finitzo, T, Hayashi, MM, Chapman, SB, Devous, MD, Close, LG, Kondraske, GV, Mendelsohn, D, Schaefer, SD & Watson, BC 1991, 'Heterogeneity in spasmodic dysphonia. Neurologic and voice findings', Archives of Neurology, vol. 48, no. 3, pp. 305-309.
Pool KD, Freeman FJ, Finitzo T, Hayashi MM, Chapman SB, Devous MD et al. Heterogeneity in spasmodic dysphonia. Neurologic and voice findings. Archives of Neurology. 1991;48(3):305-309.
Pool, K. D. ; Freeman, F. J. ; Finitzo, T. ; Hayashi, M. M. ; Chapman, S. B. ; Devous, M. D. ; Close, L. G. ; Kondraske, G. V. ; Mendelsohn, D. ; Schaefer, S. D. ; Watson, B. C. / Heterogeneity in spasmodic dysphonia. Neurologic and voice findings. In: Archives of Neurology. 1991 ; Vol. 48, No. 3. pp. 305-309.
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AU - Hayashi, M. M.

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