High-fat diet acutely affects circadian organisation and eating behavior

Julie S. Pendergast, Katrina L. Branecky, William Yang, Kate L J Ellacott, Kevin D. Niswender, Shin Yamazaki

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The organisation of timing in mammalian circadian clocks optimally coordinates behavior and physiology with daily environmental cycles. Chronic consumption of a high-fat diet alters circadian rhythms, but the acute effects on circadian organisation are unknown. To investigate the proximate effects of a high-fat diet on circadian physiology, we examined the phase relationship between central and peripheral clocks in mice fed a high-fat diet for 1 week. By 7 days, the phase of the liver rhythm was markedly advanced (by 5 h), whereas rhythms in other tissues were not affected. In addition, immediately upon consumption of a high-fat diet, the daily rhythm of eating behavior was altered. As the tissue rhythm of the suprachiasmatic nucleus was not affected by 1 week of high-fat diet consumption, the brain nuclei mediating the effect of a high-fat diet on eating behavior are likely to be downstream of the suprachiasmatic nucleus.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1350-1356
Number of pages7
JournalEuropean Journal of Neuroscience
Volume37
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2013

Fingerprint

High Fat Diet
Feeding Behavior
Suprachiasmatic Nucleus
Circadian Clocks
Circadian Rhythm
Liver
Brain

Keywords

  • C57BL/6J
  • Hypothalamus
  • Liver
  • Luciferase reporter
  • Mouse
  • Obesity

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Pendergast, J. S., Branecky, K. L., Yang, W., Ellacott, K. L. J., Niswender, K. D., & Yamazaki, S. (2013). High-fat diet acutely affects circadian organisation and eating behavior. European Journal of Neuroscience, 37(8), 1350-1356. https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.12133

High-fat diet acutely affects circadian organisation and eating behavior. / Pendergast, Julie S.; Branecky, Katrina L.; Yang, William; Ellacott, Kate L J; Niswender, Kevin D.; Yamazaki, Shin.

In: European Journal of Neuroscience, Vol. 37, No. 8, 04.2013, p. 1350-1356.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Pendergast, JS, Branecky, KL, Yang, W, Ellacott, KLJ, Niswender, KD & Yamazaki, S 2013, 'High-fat diet acutely affects circadian organisation and eating behavior', European Journal of Neuroscience, vol. 37, no. 8, pp. 1350-1356. https://doi.org/10.1111/ejn.12133
Pendergast, Julie S. ; Branecky, Katrina L. ; Yang, William ; Ellacott, Kate L J ; Niswender, Kevin D. ; Yamazaki, Shin. / High-fat diet acutely affects circadian organisation and eating behavior. In: European Journal of Neuroscience. 2013 ; Vol. 37, No. 8. pp. 1350-1356.
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