High-sodium food choices by southern, urban African Americans with heart failure

Usha K. Kollipara, Vivian Mo, Kathleen H. Toto, Lauren L. Nelson, Ruth A. Schneider, Jennifer B. Neily, Mark H. Drazner

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Sodium restriction is important in the management of heart failure (HF). Although many low-sodium educational resources are available, few are directed specifically at urban African Americans. Methods and Results: A registered dietitian prospectively interviewed 50 African-American and 25 white patients in an urban public hospital (derivation cohort) in Dallas, TX, using a food-frequency instrument that listed 146 food choices. Foods >300 mg sodium/serving consumed at least weekly by 50% of an ethnic group were classified as being a high-sodium core food for that group. Classification of foods (core or not core) was validated in a second African-American cohort (n = 144). Five high-sodium food choices were classified as core food in both the derivation and validation African-American cohorts (salt in cooking, canned vegetables, cheese, processed meats, and cold cereal) and another 3 when the derivation and validation cohorts were combined (fast food, fried chicken, and corn bread). Four of these 8 foods were not classified as core foods in whites. Conclusion: Eight high-sodium foods were frequently consumed by southern, urban African Americans with heart failure. Several of these foods were not commonly consumed by whites, emphasizing the need to be sensitive to ethnic differences in dietary habits when educating patients about sodium intake.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)144-148
Number of pages5
JournalJournal of Cardiac Failure
Volume12
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2006

Fingerprint

African Americans
Heart Failure
Sodium
Food
Fast Foods
Nutritionists
Public Hospitals
Bread
Urban Hospitals
Cooking
Cheese
Feeding Behavior
Ethnic Groups
Vegetables
Meat
Zea mays
Chickens
Salts

Keywords

  • Diet
  • Ethnicity
  • Lifestyle
  • Nutrition

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

Cite this

High-sodium food choices by southern, urban African Americans with heart failure. / Kollipara, Usha K.; Mo, Vivian; Toto, Kathleen H.; Nelson, Lauren L.; Schneider, Ruth A.; Neily, Jennifer B.; Drazner, Mark H.

In: Journal of Cardiac Failure, Vol. 12, No. 2, 03.2006, p. 144-148.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kollipara, Usha K. ; Mo, Vivian ; Toto, Kathleen H. ; Nelson, Lauren L. ; Schneider, Ruth A. ; Neily, Jennifer B. ; Drazner, Mark H. / High-sodium food choices by southern, urban African Americans with heart failure. In: Journal of Cardiac Failure. 2006 ; Vol. 12, No. 2. pp. 144-148.
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