How cholesterol metabolism and transport present novel targets for lipid treatment

John M. Dietschy

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The National Cholesterol Education Program treatment guidelines cite reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as the primary therapeutic focus of lipid-modifying treatment. Statin drugs are the most effective agents for reducing LDL. However, the limited efficacy of currently available agents at low doses suggests a need for alternative therapeutic strategies. Serum cholesterol levels reflect a complicated process of synthesis and transport that affords opportunities for intervention at multiple steps in the process. Combination therapy might improve upon lipid-modifying results that can currently be achieved with statin-based therapy, but tolerability issues related to some of the currently available drugs limit their use. Evolving, new classes of lipid-modifying therapies might improve current capabilities to reduce coronary risk. An ideal therapeutic strategy would target cholesterol absorption, excretion, and synthesis. The development of selective cholesterol absorption inhibitors represents a particularly promising approach to enhancement of LDL reduction by means of combination therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAdvanced Studies in Medicine
Volume3
Issue number4 C
StatePublished - Apr 2003

Fingerprint

Cholesterol
Lipids
Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors
LDL Lipoproteins
Therapeutics
Anticholesteremic Agents
Reducing Agents
Pharmaceutical Preparations
LDL Cholesterol
Guidelines
Education
Serum

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

How cholesterol metabolism and transport present novel targets for lipid treatment. / Dietschy, John M.

In: Advanced Studies in Medicine, Vol. 3, No. 4 C, 04.2003.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{52ba03911a13473888de49c9f224c531,
title = "How cholesterol metabolism and transport present novel targets for lipid treatment",
abstract = "The National Cholesterol Education Program treatment guidelines cite reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as the primary therapeutic focus of lipid-modifying treatment. Statin drugs are the most effective agents for reducing LDL. However, the limited efficacy of currently available agents at low doses suggests a need for alternative therapeutic strategies. Serum cholesterol levels reflect a complicated process of synthesis and transport that affords opportunities for intervention at multiple steps in the process. Combination therapy might improve upon lipid-modifying results that can currently be achieved with statin-based therapy, but tolerability issues related to some of the currently available drugs limit their use. Evolving, new classes of lipid-modifying therapies might improve current capabilities to reduce coronary risk. An ideal therapeutic strategy would target cholesterol absorption, excretion, and synthesis. The development of selective cholesterol absorption inhibitors represents a particularly promising approach to enhancement of LDL reduction by means of combination therapy.",
author = "Dietschy, {John M.}",
year = "2003",
month = "4",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "3",
journal = "Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine",
issn = "1530-3004",
publisher = "Galen Publishing LLC",
number = "4 C",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - How cholesterol metabolism and transport present novel targets for lipid treatment

AU - Dietschy, John M.

PY - 2003/4

Y1 - 2003/4

N2 - The National Cholesterol Education Program treatment guidelines cite reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as the primary therapeutic focus of lipid-modifying treatment. Statin drugs are the most effective agents for reducing LDL. However, the limited efficacy of currently available agents at low doses suggests a need for alternative therapeutic strategies. Serum cholesterol levels reflect a complicated process of synthesis and transport that affords opportunities for intervention at multiple steps in the process. Combination therapy might improve upon lipid-modifying results that can currently be achieved with statin-based therapy, but tolerability issues related to some of the currently available drugs limit their use. Evolving, new classes of lipid-modifying therapies might improve current capabilities to reduce coronary risk. An ideal therapeutic strategy would target cholesterol absorption, excretion, and synthesis. The development of selective cholesterol absorption inhibitors represents a particularly promising approach to enhancement of LDL reduction by means of combination therapy.

AB - The National Cholesterol Education Program treatment guidelines cite reduction of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol as the primary therapeutic focus of lipid-modifying treatment. Statin drugs are the most effective agents for reducing LDL. However, the limited efficacy of currently available agents at low doses suggests a need for alternative therapeutic strategies. Serum cholesterol levels reflect a complicated process of synthesis and transport that affords opportunities for intervention at multiple steps in the process. Combination therapy might improve upon lipid-modifying results that can currently be achieved with statin-based therapy, but tolerability issues related to some of the currently available drugs limit their use. Evolving, new classes of lipid-modifying therapies might improve current capabilities to reduce coronary risk. An ideal therapeutic strategy would target cholesterol absorption, excretion, and synthesis. The development of selective cholesterol absorption inhibitors represents a particularly promising approach to enhancement of LDL reduction by means of combination therapy.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0038069269&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0038069269&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:0038069269

VL - 3

JO - Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine

JF - Johns Hopkins Advanced Studies in Medicine

SN - 1530-3004

IS - 4 C

ER -