How video image size interacts with evidence strength, defendant emotion, and the defendant-victim relationship to alter perceptions of the defendant

Wendy P. Heath, Bruce D. Grannemann

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

Courtroom video presentations can range from images on small screens installed in the jury box to images on courtroom video monitors or projection screens. Does video image size affect jurors' perceptions of information presented during trials? To investigate this we manipulated video image size as well as defendant emotion level presented during testimony (low, moderate), the defendant-victim relationship (spouses, strangers), and the strength of the evidence (weak, strong). Participants (N=263) read a case and trial summary, watched video of defendant testimony, and then answered a questionnaire. Larger screens generally accentuated what was presented (e.g., made stronger evidence seem stronger and weaker evidence seem weaker), acting mainly upon trial outcome variables (e.g., verdict). Non-trial outcomes (e.g., defendant credibility) were generally affected by defendant emotion level and the defendant-victim relationship. Researchers and attorneys presenting video images need to recognize that respondents may evaluate videotaped trial evidence differently as a function of how video evidence is presented.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)496-507
Number of pages12
JournalBehavioral Sciences and the Law
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Psychology
  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Law

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'How video image size interacts with evidence strength, defendant emotion, and the defendant-victim relationship to alter perceptions of the defendant'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

  • Cite this