HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: An update on testing in routine pathology practice

Justin A. Bishop, James S. Lewis, James W. Rocco, William C. Faquin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

53 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma caused by high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is now a well-recognized tumor entity whose incidence is on the rise. Most HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas have a distinct histomorphology, and most patients fit a typical clinical profile. Importantly, HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma patients overall have significantly improved outcomes when compared to their HPV-negative counterparts, and the differences in tumor biology may soon lead to modifications in how they are treated. While high-risk HPV can be detected in a significant minority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas across anatomic subsites in the head and neck, it has become clear in recent years that the biologically and clinically favorable features are limited to tumors that harbor transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV, something that occurs predominantly (but certainly not exclusively) in the oropharynx. It is now acknowledged that detecting transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV is a necessity in routine clinical practice, but there is considerable confusion among pathologists and clinicians alike about the subsites and settings in which HPV testing should be performed. Compounding this lack of clarity is the fact that there are multiple HPV testing options available, but currently there is no clear consensus on which test or combination of tests is optimal for routine diagnostic use. This review serves as an update for practicing pathologists on the current status of HPV (and surrogate marker) testing in head and neck cancers.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)344-351
Number of pages8
JournalSeminars in Diagnostic Pathology
Volume32
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Sep 1 2015

Fingerprint

Pathology
Squamous Cell Carcinoma
Carcinoma, squamous cell of head and neck
Neoplasms
Oropharynx
Head and Neck Neoplasms
Neck
Biomarkers
Head
Carcinoma
Incidence

Keywords

  • Head and neck
  • HPV
  • Human papillomavirus
  • In situ hybridization
  • Non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma
  • P16

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck : An update on testing in routine pathology practice. / Bishop, Justin A.; Lewis, James S.; Rocco, James W.; Faquin, William C.

In: Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology, Vol. 32, No. 5, 01.09.2015, p. 344-351.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{0c7a40273d474cc4b7df7af5d35bd783,
title = "HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck: An update on testing in routine pathology practice",
abstract = "Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma caused by high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is now a well-recognized tumor entity whose incidence is on the rise. Most HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas have a distinct histomorphology, and most patients fit a typical clinical profile. Importantly, HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma patients overall have significantly improved outcomes when compared to their HPV-negative counterparts, and the differences in tumor biology may soon lead to modifications in how they are treated. While high-risk HPV can be detected in a significant minority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas across anatomic subsites in the head and neck, it has become clear in recent years that the biologically and clinically favorable features are limited to tumors that harbor transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV, something that occurs predominantly (but certainly not exclusively) in the oropharynx. It is now acknowledged that detecting transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV is a necessity in routine clinical practice, but there is considerable confusion among pathologists and clinicians alike about the subsites and settings in which HPV testing should be performed. Compounding this lack of clarity is the fact that there are multiple HPV testing options available, but currently there is no clear consensus on which test or combination of tests is optimal for routine diagnostic use. This review serves as an update for practicing pathologists on the current status of HPV (and surrogate marker) testing in head and neck cancers.",
keywords = "Head and neck, HPV, Human papillomavirus, In situ hybridization, Non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, P16",
author = "Bishop, {Justin A.} and Lewis, {James S.} and Rocco, {James W.} and Faquin, {William C.}",
year = "2015",
month = "9",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1053/j.semdp.2015.02.013",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "344--351",
journal = "Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology",
issn = "0740-2570",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "5",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - HPV-related squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck

T2 - An update on testing in routine pathology practice

AU - Bishop, Justin A.

AU - Lewis, James S.

AU - Rocco, James W.

AU - Faquin, William C.

PY - 2015/9/1

Y1 - 2015/9/1

N2 - Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma caused by high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is now a well-recognized tumor entity whose incidence is on the rise. Most HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas have a distinct histomorphology, and most patients fit a typical clinical profile. Importantly, HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma patients overall have significantly improved outcomes when compared to their HPV-negative counterparts, and the differences in tumor biology may soon lead to modifications in how they are treated. While high-risk HPV can be detected in a significant minority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas across anatomic subsites in the head and neck, it has become clear in recent years that the biologically and clinically favorable features are limited to tumors that harbor transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV, something that occurs predominantly (but certainly not exclusively) in the oropharynx. It is now acknowledged that detecting transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV is a necessity in routine clinical practice, but there is considerable confusion among pathologists and clinicians alike about the subsites and settings in which HPV testing should be performed. Compounding this lack of clarity is the fact that there are multiple HPV testing options available, but currently there is no clear consensus on which test or combination of tests is optimal for routine diagnostic use. This review serves as an update for practicing pathologists on the current status of HPV (and surrogate marker) testing in head and neck cancers.

AB - Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma caused by high-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is now a well-recognized tumor entity whose incidence is on the rise. Most HPV-related oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas have a distinct histomorphology, and most patients fit a typical clinical profile. Importantly, HPV-related oropharyngeal carcinoma patients overall have significantly improved outcomes when compared to their HPV-negative counterparts, and the differences in tumor biology may soon lead to modifications in how they are treated. While high-risk HPV can be detected in a significant minority of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas across anatomic subsites in the head and neck, it has become clear in recent years that the biologically and clinically favorable features are limited to tumors that harbor transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV, something that occurs predominantly (but certainly not exclusively) in the oropharynx. It is now acknowledged that detecting transcriptionally active, high-risk HPV is a necessity in routine clinical practice, but there is considerable confusion among pathologists and clinicians alike about the subsites and settings in which HPV testing should be performed. Compounding this lack of clarity is the fact that there are multiple HPV testing options available, but currently there is no clear consensus on which test or combination of tests is optimal for routine diagnostic use. This review serves as an update for practicing pathologists on the current status of HPV (and surrogate marker) testing in head and neck cancers.

KW - Head and neck

KW - HPV

KW - Human papillomavirus

KW - In situ hybridization

KW - Non-keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma

KW - P16

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84940450597&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84940450597&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1053/j.semdp.2015.02.013

DO - 10.1053/j.semdp.2015.02.013

M3 - Article

C2 - 25724476

AN - SCOPUS:84940450597

VL - 32

SP - 344

EP - 351

JO - Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology

JF - Seminars in Diagnostic Pathology

SN - 0740-2570

IS - 5

ER -