Human pancreatic cancer cell exosomes, but not human normal cell exosomes, act as an initiator in cell transformation

Karoliina Stefanius, Kelly Servage, Marcela de Souza Santos, Hillery Fields Gray, Jason E. Toombs, Suneeta Chimalapati, Min S. Kim, Venkat S. Malladi, Rolf Brekken, Kim Orth

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Cancer evolves through a multistep process that occurs by the temporal accumulation of genetic mutations. Tumor-derived exosomes are emerging contributors to tumorigenesis. To understand how exosomes might contribute to cell transformation, we utilized the classic two-step NIH/3T3 cell transformation assay and observed that exosomes isolated from pancreatic cancer cells, but not normal human cells, can initiate malignant cell transformation and these transformed cells formed tumors in vivo. However, cancer cell exosomes are unable to transform cells alone or to act as a promoter of cell transformation. Utilizing proteomics and exome sequencing, we discovered cancer cell exosomes act as an initiator by inducing random mutations in recipient cells. Cells from the pool of randomly mutated cells are driven to transformation by a classic promoter resulting in foci, each of which encode a unique genetic profile. Our studies describe a novel molecular understanding of how cancer cell exosomes contribute to cell transformation. Editorial note: This article has been through an editorial process in which the authors decide how to respond to the issues raised during peer review. The Reviewing Editor's assessment is that major issues remain unresolved (see decision letter).

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournaleLife
Volume8
DOIs
StatePublished - May 28 2019

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Exosomes
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Cells
Tumors
Neoplasms
Assays
Exome
NIH 3T3 Cells
Peer Review

Keywords

  • cancer
  • cancer biology
  • cell biology
  • exosomes
  • mouse
  • pancreatic cancer
  • proteomics
  • transformation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Immunology and Microbiology(all)

Cite this

Human pancreatic cancer cell exosomes, but not human normal cell exosomes, act as an initiator in cell transformation. / Stefanius, Karoliina; Servage, Kelly; de Souza Santos, Marcela; Gray, Hillery Fields; Toombs, Jason E.; Chimalapati, Suneeta; Kim, Min S.; Malladi, Venkat S.; Brekken, Rolf; Orth, Kim.

In: eLife, Vol. 8, 28.05.2019.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Stefanius, Karoliina ; Servage, Kelly ; de Souza Santos, Marcela ; Gray, Hillery Fields ; Toombs, Jason E. ; Chimalapati, Suneeta ; Kim, Min S. ; Malladi, Venkat S. ; Brekken, Rolf ; Orth, Kim. / Human pancreatic cancer cell exosomes, but not human normal cell exosomes, act as an initiator in cell transformation. In: eLife. 2019 ; Vol. 8.
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