Human Papillomavirus-Related Multiphenotypic Sinonasal Carcinoma: A Case Report Documenting the Potential for Very Late Tumor Recurrence

Akeesha A. Shah, Eric D. Lamarre, Justin A. Bishop

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

16 Scopus citations

Abstract

Human papillomavirus (HPV)-related multiphenotypic sinonasal carcinoma is a peculiar sinonasal tract tumor that demonstrates features of both a surface-derived and salivary gland carcinoma. Implicit in its name, this tumor has a consistent association with high-risk HPV, particularly type 33. It was first described in 2013 under the designation of HPV-related carcinoma with adenoid cystic carcinoma-like features. However, since its initial description additional cases have emerged which demonstrate a wide morphologic spectrum and relatively indolent clinical behavior. Herein we report our experience with a case of HPV-related multiphenotypic sinonasal carcinoma that was initially classified as adenoid cystic carcinoma in the 1980s. The patient recurred after a 30-year disease free interval. RNA in situ hybridization confirmed the presence of high-risk HPV in both her recurrence and her initial tumor in the 1980s, which allowed for reclassification as HPV-related multiphenotypic sinonasal carcinoma. Our case adds to the literature of this relatively newly described entity and supports the indolent clinical behavior of this neoplasm but also demonstrates a potential for very late local recurrence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-6
Number of pages6
JournalHead and Neck Pathology
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Feb 14 2018

Keywords

  • Adenoid cystic carcinoma
  • Carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features
  • Human papillomavirus
  • Multiphenotypic sinonasal carcinoma
  • Sinonasal carcinoma

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine
  • Otorhinolaryngology
  • Oncology

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