Human papillomavirus vaccine recommendations and agreement with mandated human papillomavirus vaccination for 11-to-12-year-old girls: A statewide survey of Texas physicians

Jessica A. Kahn, H. Paul Cooper, Susan T. Vadaparampil, Barbara C. Pence, Armin D. Weinberg, Salvatore J. LoCoco, Susan L. Rosenthal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

80 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: The purpose of this study was to examine Texas physicians' recommendations for the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in 11-to-12-year-old girls, intention to recommend HPV vaccines to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and attitudes about mandated HPV vaccination for 11-to-12-year-old girls. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, web-based survey of Texas physicians who provide direct patient care in family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/ gynecology, and internal medicine in September 2008. The three outcome variables were: HPV vaccine recommendations to 11-to-12-year-old girls, likelihood of recommending the vaccine to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and agreement with mandated vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to determine practice-related and attitudinal factors associated with each outcome. Results: Of the 1,122 respondents, 48.5% stated they always recommended HPV vaccines to girls, 68.4% were likely to recommend the vaccine to boys, and 41.7% agreed with mandated vaccination. In multivariate logistic regression models, variables independently associated with recommendation to 11-to-12-year-old girls included: percentage of patients with Medicaid [odds ratio (OR), 1.02; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.01-1.03], academic versus nonacademic practice (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.05-4.23), office procedures to maximize vaccination (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.56), HPV knowledge (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04-1.49), valuing HPV vaccine information from both professional organizations (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.15-3.16) and professional conferences (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.10-2.57), belief in mandated HPV vaccination (OR, 5.38; 95% CI, 3.28-8.83), and barriers to vaccination (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00-1.16). Discussion: Half of the physicians in this study did not follow current recommendations for universal HPV vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Factors linked to vaccine recommendations may be targeted in educational or policy interventions.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2325-2332
Number of pages8
JournalCancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention
Volume18
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 2009
Externally publishedYes

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Human papillomavirus 11
Papillomavirus Vaccines
Vaccination
Odds Ratio
Confidence Intervals
Physicians
Vaccines
Logistic Models
Surveys and Questionnaires
Medicaid
Internal Medicine
Gynecology
Obstetrics
Patient Care
Regression Analysis
Medicine
Pediatrics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Oncology

Cite this

Human papillomavirus vaccine recommendations and agreement with mandated human papillomavirus vaccination for 11-to-12-year-old girls : A statewide survey of Texas physicians. / Kahn, Jessica A.; Cooper, H. Paul; Vadaparampil, Susan T.; Pence, Barbara C.; Weinberg, Armin D.; LoCoco, Salvatore J.; Rosenthal, Susan L.

In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention, Vol. 18, No. 8, 01.08.2009, p. 2325-2332.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kahn, Jessica A. ; Cooper, H. Paul ; Vadaparampil, Susan T. ; Pence, Barbara C. ; Weinberg, Armin D. ; LoCoco, Salvatore J. ; Rosenthal, Susan L. / Human papillomavirus vaccine recommendations and agreement with mandated human papillomavirus vaccination for 11-to-12-year-old girls : A statewide survey of Texas physicians. In: Cancer Epidemiology Biomarkers and Prevention. 2009 ; Vol. 18, No. 8. pp. 2325-2332.
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abstract = "Background: The purpose of this study was to examine Texas physicians' recommendations for the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in 11-to-12-year-old girls, intention to recommend HPV vaccines to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and attitudes about mandated HPV vaccination for 11-to-12-year-old girls. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, web-based survey of Texas physicians who provide direct patient care in family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/ gynecology, and internal medicine in September 2008. The three outcome variables were: HPV vaccine recommendations to 11-to-12-year-old girls, likelihood of recommending the vaccine to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and agreement with mandated vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to determine practice-related and attitudinal factors associated with each outcome. Results: Of the 1,122 respondents, 48.5{\%} stated they always recommended HPV vaccines to girls, 68.4{\%} were likely to recommend the vaccine to boys, and 41.7{\%} agreed with mandated vaccination. In multivariate logistic regression models, variables independently associated with recommendation to 11-to-12-year-old girls included: percentage of patients with Medicaid [odds ratio (OR), 1.02; 95{\%} confidence interval (95{\%} CI), 1.01-1.03], academic versus nonacademic practice (OR, 2.11; 95{\%} CI, 1.05-4.23), office procedures to maximize vaccination (OR, 1.25; 95{\%} CI, 1.01-1.56), HPV knowledge (OR, 1.25; 95{\%} CI, 1.04-1.49), valuing HPV vaccine information from both professional organizations (OR, 1.90; 95{\%} CI, 1.15-3.16) and professional conferences (OR, 1.68; 95{\%} CI, 1.10-2.57), belief in mandated HPV vaccination (OR, 5.38; 95{\%} CI, 3.28-8.83), and barriers to vaccination (OR, 1.08; 95{\%} CI, 1.00-1.16). Discussion: Half of the physicians in this study did not follow current recommendations for universal HPV vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Factors linked to vaccine recommendations may be targeted in educational or policy interventions.",
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T2 - A statewide survey of Texas physicians

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AU - Cooper, H. Paul

AU - Vadaparampil, Susan T.

AU - Pence, Barbara C.

AU - Weinberg, Armin D.

AU - LoCoco, Salvatore J.

AU - Rosenthal, Susan L.

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N2 - Background: The purpose of this study was to examine Texas physicians' recommendations for the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in 11-to-12-year-old girls, intention to recommend HPV vaccines to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and attitudes about mandated HPV vaccination for 11-to-12-year-old girls. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, web-based survey of Texas physicians who provide direct patient care in family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/ gynecology, and internal medicine in September 2008. The three outcome variables were: HPV vaccine recommendations to 11-to-12-year-old girls, likelihood of recommending the vaccine to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and agreement with mandated vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to determine practice-related and attitudinal factors associated with each outcome. Results: Of the 1,122 respondents, 48.5% stated they always recommended HPV vaccines to girls, 68.4% were likely to recommend the vaccine to boys, and 41.7% agreed with mandated vaccination. In multivariate logistic regression models, variables independently associated with recommendation to 11-to-12-year-old girls included: percentage of patients with Medicaid [odds ratio (OR), 1.02; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.01-1.03], academic versus nonacademic practice (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.05-4.23), office procedures to maximize vaccination (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.56), HPV knowledge (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04-1.49), valuing HPV vaccine information from both professional organizations (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.15-3.16) and professional conferences (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.10-2.57), belief in mandated HPV vaccination (OR, 5.38; 95% CI, 3.28-8.83), and barriers to vaccination (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00-1.16). Discussion: Half of the physicians in this study did not follow current recommendations for universal HPV vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Factors linked to vaccine recommendations may be targeted in educational or policy interventions.

AB - Background: The purpose of this study was to examine Texas physicians' recommendations for the quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in 11-to-12-year-old girls, intention to recommend HPV vaccines to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and attitudes about mandated HPV vaccination for 11-to-12-year-old girls. Materials and Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional, web-based survey of Texas physicians who provide direct patient care in family medicine, pediatrics, obstetrics/ gynecology, and internal medicine in September 2008. The three outcome variables were: HPV vaccine recommendations to 11-to-12-year-old girls, likelihood of recommending the vaccine to 11-to-12-year-old boys, and agreement with mandated vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Univariate and logistic regression analyses were used to determine practice-related and attitudinal factors associated with each outcome. Results: Of the 1,122 respondents, 48.5% stated they always recommended HPV vaccines to girls, 68.4% were likely to recommend the vaccine to boys, and 41.7% agreed with mandated vaccination. In multivariate logistic regression models, variables independently associated with recommendation to 11-to-12-year-old girls included: percentage of patients with Medicaid [odds ratio (OR), 1.02; 95% confidence interval (95% CI), 1.01-1.03], academic versus nonacademic practice (OR, 2.11; 95% CI, 1.05-4.23), office procedures to maximize vaccination (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.01-1.56), HPV knowledge (OR, 1.25; 95% CI, 1.04-1.49), valuing HPV vaccine information from both professional organizations (OR, 1.90; 95% CI, 1.15-3.16) and professional conferences (OR, 1.68; 95% CI, 1.10-2.57), belief in mandated HPV vaccination (OR, 5.38; 95% CI, 3.28-8.83), and barriers to vaccination (OR, 1.08; 95% CI, 1.00-1.16). Discussion: Half of the physicians in this study did not follow current recommendations for universal HPV vaccination of 11-to-12-year-old girls. Factors linked to vaccine recommendations may be targeted in educational or policy interventions.

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